This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1855

Henry W. Longfellow publishes The Song of Hiawatha. Although the poet never visited Minnesota, his poem depicts locations such as Minnehaha Falls and inspired some of the state's place names, including Bena, Nushka, Osseo, Ponemah, and Wabasso.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1851

The Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet open a school for girls in St. Paul, enrolling fourteen pupils and holding classes in the former Chapel of St. Paul. Originally named St. Mary's, their school would eventually be known as St. Joseph's Academy.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 21, 2005

Three Minnesota National Guardsmen--David Day of St. Louis Park, Jesse Lhotka of Appleton, and Jason Timmerman of Tracy--are killed in Iraq, marking the deadliest day for Minnesota soldiers since Vietnam. Sergeant Lhotka is credited with saving a fellow guardsman's life and helping evacuate another soldier before being killed by the roadside blast.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 6, 1948

Mary Ann Courteau, who later became known as singer and songwriter Mary MacGregor, is born in St. Paul. In 1976 she recorded the pop song "Torn Between Two Lovers," which became a number-one hit the following year. She married Paul D. MacGregor on November 13, 1971, but they later divorced.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 9, 2006

The Minnesota Immigration with Dignity March draws more than 30,000 people who support extending legal status to undocumented workers. Championing family reunification and comprehensive reform, immigrants and their supporters march from the Cathedral of St. Paul to the capitol.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 12, 1946

The Minnesota Historical Society accepts a grant from the Weyerhaeuser family to establish the Forest Products History Foundation. Initially located in St. Paul, the foundation evolves into the international organization known as the Forest History Society. Now located in Durham, North Carolina, the society's mission remains the same: to preserve and interpret the documents of forest and conservation history.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 15, 1875

Bishop Thomas L. Grace dedicates the Church of St. Michael in Stillwater, with Father John Ireland presiding. The press of the day acclaims it as the finest church in the state.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 27, 2006

Curtis Warnke, publisher of the Wood Lake News from 1966 to 1994 and the youngest person elected to the Minnesota Legislature (in 1956), passes away at age seventy-four after a brief battle with cancer.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 18, 1902

Aurelia Wheeldin, one of the earliest female African American boxers, is born in Minnesota. She would study music at Macalester College, earn recognition as a world female champion bantamweight, and eventually move to New York City and perform in musicals at the Apollo Theater.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 9, 1940

Two members of Alcoholics Anonymous visit Minnesota to see a football game and to contact several people who had asked for help with their drinking problems. They connect with one, B. Patrick Cronin, who would date his sobriety to November 11, 1940, and eventually help start more than 450 AA groups in the Midwest.

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