This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1820

Colonel Josiah Snelling lays the cornerstone of Fort St. Anthony, which would later bear his name. Snelling had chosen to build a stone fort rather than the typical wooden structure, in part because there was not enough wood available in the immediate area and in part because the fort was to sit on a limestone bluff. His choice would prove troublesome: while many of his soldiers were familiar with carpentry, few had any experience with stonemasonry.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1823

The Virginia is the first steamboat to reach Fort St. Anthony (later Snelling), having made the 729-mile-trip from St. Louis in twenty days. Among the Virginia 's passengers is Italian adventurer Giacomo C. Beltrami.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1823

Major Joseph Delafield and his party arrive at Grand Portage to run the first survey of the international boundary in the region.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1827

William Windom is born in Belmont City, Ohio. Settling in Winona in 1855, Windom would represent Minnesota in the U.S. Congress as both a congressman and a senator, and he would be secretary of the treasury under Presidents James A. Garfield and Benjamin Harrison. His likeness appears on the 1891 two-dollar bill, and Windom in Cottonwood County is named for him. He died in 1891.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1851

The Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet open a girls school in St. Paul, enrolling fourteen pupils and holding classes in the former Chapel of St. Paul. Originally named St. Mary's, their school would eventually be known as St. Joseph's Academy.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1853

The Chicago Landverein, or land society, which eventually established the town of New Ulm, is formed by a group of German immigrants. At first, lawyers and preachers are banned from membership.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1855

Jacob Fjelde is born in Norway. He would sculpt the work Hiawatha and Minnehaha, displayed in Minnehaha Park, Minneapolis, and the statue of Ole Bull located in Loring Park, Minneapolis.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1855

Henry W. Longfellow publishes The Song of Hiawatha . Although the poet never visited Minnesota, his poem depicts locations such as Minnehaha Falls and inspired some of the state's place names, including Bena, Nushka, Osseo, Ponemah, and Wabasso.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1858

Inventor and businessman Marshall B. Lloyd is born in St. Paul. He would be involved in many ventures in Canada and the Dakotas before moving to Minneapolis in 1900. Once there, he would invent machines to weave wire into doormats and, later, the woven-wire bedspring mattress. Head of the Lloyd Manufacturing Company, he would then move to Menominee, Michigan, and invent a wicker-weaving machine that was thirty times faster than hand-weaving.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1862

The Augustana Synod of the Lutheran Church gives Eric Norelius permission to open an academy. First established in Red Wing, then moved to East Union, the college that would become Gustavus Adolphus permanently located in St. Peter in 1876.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1863

In the Civil War, the Third Minnesota Regiment is involved in the capture of Little Rock, Arkansas. A painting of their entry into the city hangs in the governor's office in the state capitol.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1864

At Brice's Cross Roads in Mississippi, Confederate forces led by Nathan Bedford Forrest capture 233 soldiers from the Ninth Minnesota Regiment. The captives are sent to Andersonville prison in Georgia, where 119 of them die.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1871

Cretin High School opens in St. Paul. Named for Joseph Cretin, the first bishop of the diocese of St. Paul, the school would merge with Derham Hall high school in 1987.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1878

The Northwestern Telephone Exchange Company of Minneapolis is organized, with fifty-three subscribers. The exchange begins operating in February 1879, and a line is strung to St. Paul in April 1879.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1880

Captain R. H. L. Jewett receives from the government a shipment of young carp with which to stock Rice County's lakes. A government commission had been formed in response to European immigrants' demands for the fish.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1887

The first edition of the Prison Mirror, the newspaper of the state penitentiary, is published.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1895

The ocean liner St. Paul is launched at last. The International Navigation Company had intended to launch the ship on March 25, inviting seventy dignitaries to Philadelphia for the occasion. After the champagne bottle was broken, however, the ship refused to budge.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1902

Faribault's first passenger train arrives.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1902

The St. Paul Saints minor league baseball team beats the Indianapolis Indians 4-0 in the first American Association game at Lexington Park.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1909

Mailcarrier John Beargrease dies. Born in 1858, the son of an Ojibwe leader and a white woman, Beargrease grew up in Beaver Bay and delivered mail along the north shore of Lake Superior from 1887 to 1904, his route being Two Harbors to Grand Marais. During open water the trip took him three days by rowboat, and in the winter he used a dogsled.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1917

The St. Paul Public Library opens its new building at Fourth and Washington Streets, with Dr. W. Dawson Johnston serving as librarian.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1918

A forest fire begins on the railroad line between Duluth and Hibbing and burns for the next three days, reaching Duluth on the thirteenth. Thirty-eight communities, including the cities of Cloquet, Carlton, and Moose Lake, and the towns of Adolph, Brookston, Munger, Grand Lake, Pike Lake, and Twig, are burned and 435 people are killed. After the blaze, forest salvagers cut 1.6 million tons of lumber. In response to a series of lawsuits, the Minnesota Supreme Court rules that the railroads, and by extension the U.S.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1922

Frances Gumm, later known as actress and singer Judy Garland, is born in Grand Rapids. She died in London on June 23, 1969.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1925

"The Arrowhead" is selected as the official moniker for northeastern Minnesota, the result of a nationwide contest sponsored by the Northeastern Minnesota Civic and Commerce Association of Duluth.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1930

Golf great Bobby Jones plays a round at the Interlachen Country Club in Edina on the first day of the U.S. Open Championship. At the end of the two-day tournament, he wins the title for the fourth time.

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