This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1930

Sauk Centre's Sinclair Lewis receives the Nobel Prize in Literature, the first American so honored. His popular titles include Main Street, Arrowsmith, Elmer Gantry, and Babbitt .

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1933

Workers at the Hormel meat packing plant in Austin stage the first sit-down strike in American labor history, occupying the factory to prevent non-strikers from operating the equipment. The strike is settled on December 8 after hearings by the Industrial Commission of Minnesota.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1934

Baseball slugger Roger Maris is born in Hibbing. In 1961 he would hit sixty-one home runs for the Yankees, breaking Babe Ruth's single season record, which had stood for thirty-four years. Maris's record would be broken thirty-seven years later by Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1941

Charles A. Lindbergh, Jr., is the featured speaker at a large America First rally in Minneapolis. The America First Committee promoted U.S. isolationism during the years leading up to World War II. Lindbergh's anti-war activity reduced his stature in many people's eyes, but after war was declared he would dedicate himself to the battle for victory, flying fifty missions in the Pacific.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1949

A destructive windstorm sweeps through Minnesota, causing $10 million in losses to the corn crop and over $1 million in property damage in St. Paul alone. Amazingly, no deaths are reported.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1966

James Arness, a Minneapolis native famous for his role as marshal Matt Dillon in the western series Gunsmoke, appears on the cover of TV Guide.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1971

About 250 demonstrators in Minneapolis protest the Vietnam War with a march from the University of Minnesota campus to the Federal Building on Washington Avenue, where they throw a few snowballs and then disperse to distribute leaflets and "get into raps with people about the war."

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1975

The ore boat Edmund Fitzgerald sinks in Lake Superior, and twenty-nine crewmembers drown.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1975

A fierce, three-day blizzard strikes, bringing one to two feet of snow (with some drifts reaching twenty feet) and winds up to eighty miles per hour, closing most Minnesota roads, stranding a train at Willmar, and killing thirty-five people and 15,000 head of livestock. The St. Paul Pioneer Press reports that an offshoot of an Arctic storm has blasted into the Midwest, commenting that the "Wind ain't whistlin' Dixie."

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1976

Governor Wendell R. Anderson announces that he will fill newly elected Vice President Walter F. Mondale's U.S. Senate seat. He resigns as governor and is replaced by Lieutenant Governor Rudy Perpich, who then appoints Anderson to complete Mondale's term. The move ends Anderson's political career and makes Perpich's: Anderson would not earn reelection to the Senate in 1978, but Perpich would serve out Anderson's term and be elected governor in 1982.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1976

During a heavy snowstorm, 325 cars are damaged in a pileup on a Minneapolis freeway.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1983

Mickey's Diner in St. Paul, built in 1939, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and becomes a protected landmark.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1988

The Minneapolis Sculpture Garden opens. Designed by modernist architect Edward Larrabee Barnes in collaboration with landscape architect Peter Rothschild, it is the home of the famous Spoonbridge and Cherry by Coosje van Bruggen and Claes Oldenburg.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 1993

Ralph Ware, Jr., who played an instrumental role in creating the Heart of the Earth School, dies in Oklahoma. Founded in 1972, the Heart of the Earth School at the Center for American Indian Education in Minneapolis was the nation's first alternative school for Native Americans. It still emphasizes individual learning styles and parent and community involvement in education. Ware, a Kiowa, was born in Lawton, Oklahoma.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 10, 2000

St. Augusta Township in rural Stearns County becomes the city of Ventura as five new city officials take the oath of office to serve this community, which was named for Governor Jesse Ventura as part of a political strategy to prevent annexation attempts by St. Cloud, the county seat. The former township clerk comments, "We are about to form the newest city in the state of Minnesota." In November voters would overwhelmingly choose to change the city's name from Ventura to St. Augusta.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 11, 1680

Father Louis Hennepin, exploring the Mississippi River north from Illinois by canoe, is captured by a group of Dakota. During his captivity he is the first white man to see the Falls of St. Anthony, which he names for his patron saint. On July 25, explorer Daniel Greysolon, the Sieur Du Luth, would arrange for Hennepin's release.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 11, 1811

Henry Jackson is born in the state of Virginia. He would move to St. Paul in 1842 and rent a place from Pierre "Pig's Eye" Parrant. A trader and merchant, he would serve as the city's first postmaster and its first justice of the peace.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 11, 1835

Thomas Williamson and Alexander Huggins organize a church at Fort Snelling, probably the first Protestant church in Minnesota. Although Gideon H. and Samuel W. Pond had started their Dakota mission the year before, they had not yet organized a church. The French had a Catholic mission on Lake Pepin in the 1700s, and Father Lucien Galtier would establish a Catholic church in Mendota in 1840. The First Presbyterian Church of Minneapolis descends from the fort's church.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 11, 1835

English traveler George Featherstonhaugh reaches Fort Snelling. He had been hired by the U.S. War Department to explore the geology of the Upper Midwest. He continues up the Minnesota River to Lake Traverse, and in 1847 he would publish the book A Canoe Voyage up the Minnay Sotor .

This Day in Minnesota History

January 11, 1844

Samuel R. Van Sant is born in Rock Island, Illinois. The state's fifteenth governor, serving from 1901 to 1905, he would establish the State Board of Control to handle issues affecting criminals and the mentally disabled. He died on October 3, 1936, in Attica, Indiana.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 11, 1849

Minnesota Territory is divided into three judicial districts. The first district, the region between the Mississippi and St. Croix Rivers, holds court in Stillwater and is presided over by Aaron Goodrich. The second, the lands north of the Minnesota River and west of the Mississippi River, holds court in St. Anthony, with Bradley B. Meeker as judge. South of the Minnesota River is the territory of Judge David Cooper, whose court is in Mendota.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 11, 1856

Thirteen New Ulm residents establish the state's first chapter of Turnverein . The Turnverein motto is "a sound mind in a sound body," and members sponsor social, educational, and physical events.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 11, 1858

Wadena County, named for a trading post on the Crow Wing River, is formed.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 11, 1858

Minnesota becomes the thirty-second state. The enabling act for statehood had been passed on February 26, 1857, and the state's constitution was written that summer and ratified in October. Full statehood had been held up by southern senators who wanted Kansas to enter the Union as a slave state. Finally approved by Congress, the bill is signed by President James Buchanan. Word of statehood would not reach St. Paul until May 13.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 11, 1859

The Athenaeum, a structure dedicated to educational lectures and social events for Germans, opens in St. Paul.

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