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This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1907

Harold E. Stassen is born in West St. Paul. Elected governor at age thirty-two, he would be the youngest individual to hold that office, from 1939 to 1943. He would resign as governor to serve as lieutenant commander in the navy during World War II. His long and distinguished career in public service would unfortunately be overshadowed by a string of defeats as he sought the Republican nomination for president. He died in 2001.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1909

President Theodore Roosevelt establishes Superior National Forest. Six weeks later Ontario's government responds in kind by creating Quetico Provincial Forest Reserve. Exploitative practices are restricted in these areas, thereby preserving the beauty of lakes and trees for future generations.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1918

Patty Berg is born in Minneapolis. A consummate golfer and member of the World Golf Hall of Fame, she would win the U.S. Women's Open in 1946 and claim victory in seven Western Open Tournaments and four Titleholders Championships.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1919

Author Kathleen Winsor is born in Olivia. Her novel Forever Amber , published in 1944, would be banned in Boston because of its sexual content. With that publicity, it naturally became a best seller.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1930

Duluth's municipal airport is dedicated and a crowd of 15,000 attends the ceremony and air show.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1933

Leeann W. Chin is born in Canton, China. She would immigrate to the United States in 1956 and open her first restaurant in Minnetonka's Bonaventure Shopping Mall in 1980. Today, her chain of Chin's Asia Fresh restaurants specializes in Asian fusion.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1944

The cruiser Duluth is launched in Newport News, Virginia, christened by Ella T. Hatch, wife of Duluth mayor Edward H. Hatch. In May 1945 the ship becomes part of the U.S. fleet in World War II.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1955

Commercial production of taconite at the Reserve Mining Company's plant in Silver Bay begins. Taconite had been developed in 1919 in Babbitt, but large-scale production wasn't begun until Edward W. Davis had perfected a method to process it and the richer parts of the iron ranges had been mined out.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1956

Elvis Presley performs at the Minneapolis Auditorium for a crowd of 3,000.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1967

Rod Carew plays his first major league baseball game with the Minnesota Twins, hitting a single.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1968

A tornado kills nine in Tracy, Lyon County.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1970

Police arrest Ronald Reed, a twenty-year-old suspect in an Omaha bank robbery, on charges of conspiracy to kidnap Governor Harold LeVander and St. Paul city councilwoman Rosalie Butler and hold them hostage for exchange with black political prisoners. Police connect Reed to the Black Panther Party, but Emory Douglass, the Black Panther's national minister of culture, denies Reed's membership in the party. Reed, an ROTC member at the University of Minnesota, is held in Ramsey County jail on a $150,000 bond, the highest in the state's history.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1976

More than 400 bookbinders in the Twin Cities area go on strike against the Quality Park, Minnesota, Heinrich, Mackay, and Tension envelope companies after a bargaining session fails to resolve differences about a new contract, including a disagreement about a cost-of-living clause. The striking members of the Graphic Arts International Union would settle with all their employers two months later.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1977

The city of Kinney, St. Louis County, secedes from the United States. The city council, frustrated by unsuccessful attempts to obtain a grant from the federal government for a water project, decides to secede and apply for foreign aid because "there is less paperwork." Passports are issued by sympathizers in New Haven, Connecticut. Although the United States did not recognize Kinney as a foreign country, Duluth's frozen food king Jeno Pauluccii did, giving Kinney a used Ford to replace the city police car (which no longer ran) and ten cases of frozen pizza for good measure.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1978

Hubert H. Humphrey dies. Humphrey was born in Wallace, South Dakota, on May 27, 1911. State campaign manager for Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1944 and a founder of the anticommunist group Americans for Democratic Action, Humphrey entered the national spotlight after delivering a rousing address on civil rights at the 1948 Democratic National Convention. He served in the Senate beginning in 1948 and was elected vice president under Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1982

Nature writer and environmentalist Sigurd Olson dies in Ely. Born in Chicago in 1899, Olson served as a canoe guide in the boundary waters region and was active in environmental issues beginning in the 1920s, playing a prominent role in the battle for federal protection of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness and serving as president of the Wilderness Society.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1990

The Target Center arena opens in Minneapolis.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1993

The North Stars professional hockey team plays its final game in the Met Center against the Chicago Blackhawks, losing 3-2. The team moves to Dallas later that year.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 13, 1994

Demolition begins on the Metropolitan Sports Center in Bloomington, former home of the North Stars professional hockey team and venue for entertainment events. The first bombing attempt, with a detonator button pressed by Michael Franson, is largely unsuccessful, with much of the building still standing ten minutes after the scheduled implosion. Eventually, the structure is brought down with bulldozers and other heavy equipment.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 14, 1671

In a ceremony at Sault Ste. Marie, the Sieur de St. Lusson formally claims the territory that would become northeastern Minnesota for France.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 14, 1766

Englishman Jonathan Carver enters the cave that would one day bear his name. Carver writes in his diary: "came to the great stone cave called by the Naudowessies [Dakota] the House of Spirits. This cave is doubtless a greater curiosity than my short stay and want of convenience allowed me to sufficiently explore." The St. Paul cave would be partially filled in by debris and its entrance obscured, rediscovered in 1913, covered again, and once again discovered in 1977.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 14, 1798

Fur trader Alexis Bailly is born in St. Joseph, Canada. He would precede Henry H. Sibley as an agent for the American Fur Company in Mendota. In addition to his work with the fur trade, Bailly would be one of the first wheat growers in Minnesota and a member of the territorial legislature. He died in 1861

This Day in Minnesota History

January 14, 1805

Pine City records a high temperature of 108 degrees.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 14, 1830

The council house of the Indian agency at St. Peter's (later Mendota) is destroyed by arson. Arsonists strike again on February 24, 1831, burning the agency home. Indian agent Lawrence Taliaferro was unpopular with corrupt traders, who disliked his strict enforcement of federal rules.

This Day in Minnesota History

January 14, 1833

William Watts Folwell is born in Romulus, New York. An educator and historian, Folwell would serve as the University of Minnesota's first president, help found the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, and author a four-volume history of Minnesota. He died in 1929.

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