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Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie Railroad (Soo Line)

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George E. Mackinnon with train crew

Soo Line diesel to Chicago, 1948. Photographer: George Miles Ryan Studio

The Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie Railroad, commonly known as the Soo Line from a phonetic spelling of Sault, helped Minnesota farmers and millers prosper by hauling grain directly from Minneapolis to eastern markets.

Prominent Minneapolis businessmen founded the railroad, originally called the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie and Atlantic, in 1883. But Israel Washburn, governor of Maine and brother of Cadwallader (C.C.) and William Washburn, had proposed such a railroad to the Minneapolis Board of Trade as early as 1873.

William D. Washburn was the railroad's first president and one of its founders, along with Thomas Lowry, Charles Pillsbury, H.T. Welles, John Martin, George R. Newell, Anthony Kelly, C.M. Loring, Clinton Morrison, J.K. Sidle, W.W. Eastman, William D. Hale, and Charles J. Martin. These men paid for the railroad without public money or land grants, which was extremely rare for railroads of the time. Also rare, their railroad had a reputation throughout its history as being free of corruption and irregular business practices.

The railroad's first track ran forty-six miles from Turtle Lake, Wisconsin, to Bruce, Wisconsin. It opened for business in June 1884, leasing connecting track from Turtle Lake to Minneapolis from another railroad, the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha. In 1887, the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie and Atlantic Railroad reached the port of Sault Ste. Marie, allowing grain and flour to be shipped directly from Minneapolis to eastern markets by rail for the first time. Previously, Minneapolis and the surrounding area were at a disadvantage, since Chicago- and Milwaukee-based railroads controlled access to markets in the East. The Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie and Atlantic Railroad broke their stranglehold and set rates more favorable to farmers and millers of the Upper Midwest.

In 1888, the railroad was renamed the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie, often called the Soo Line. New track was built regularly through 1915, expanding the line across the Upper Midwest and into Canada. Canadian Pacific Railway was a majority stock owner in the Soo Line from 1888 on, but the Soo Line continued for years as a separate company, with Thomas Lowry as president.

The primary business of the Soo Line was hauling grain, but the railroad also carried lumber, iron ore, and passengers. In 1909, it took over operations of the Wisconsin Central Railway, signing a ninety-nine-year lease, to further expand its operations in Wisconsin. Both the Soo Line and the Wisconsin Central slid into bankruptcy during the Depression of the 1930s, with the Soo Line recovering first, in 1944.

The railroad continued to haul freight profitably through the 1950s but discontinued its passenger service as competition from automobiles and lack of ridership cut into profits. Local Soo Line passenger routes were stopped first, in 1959, followed by the line's summer vacation routes. The best known of these routes, the Mountaineer, stopped in 1960. The last Soo Line passenger train anywhere along the line traveled between Milwaukee and Calumet, Michigan, in March 1968.

Years before that, in 1961, the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie officially merged with the Wisconsin Central Railway and the Canadian Pacific-controlled Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railroad. They formed one new company, the Soo Line. This company made money immediately and continued to focus on transporting grain.

In 1985, the Soo Line bought one of its longtime competitors, the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific (known as the Milwaukee Road). A large part of the Soo Line spun off to form a new Wisconsin Central in 1987, and in the 1990s, Canadian Pacific Railway took over what was left of the Soo Line, ending its existence as a separate company.

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© Minnesota Historical Society
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  • Related Resources

Abbey, Wallace W. The Little Jewel. Pueblo, CO: Pinon Productions, 1984.

Atwater, Isaac, ed. History of the City of Minneapolis, Minnesota. vol. 1. New York: Munsell and Company, Publishers, 1893.

Dorin, Patrick. The Soo Line. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, [1979].

Lydon, James W. History of the Soo Line Railroad. [N.p., 1961?].

Related Images

George E. Mackinnon with train crew
George E. Mackinnon with train crew
Soo Line Railway passenger ticket
Soo Line Railway passenger ticket
Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railway Company locomotive
Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railway Company locomotive
Soo Line Railway employee's time pass
Soo Line Railway employee's time pass
Extending Soo Line tracks, Minneapolis
Extending Soo Line tracks, Minneapolis
Arrival of harvesting machinery by train
Arrival of harvesting machinery by train
Soo Line Railway employee pass
Soo Line Railway employee pass
Laying track near Detroit Lakes
Laying track near Detroit Lakes
Soo Depot, Pierz
Soo Depot, Pierz
Soo Line Terminal Elevator
Soo Line Terminal Elevator
Soo Line Shops and yard, Minneapolis
Soo Line Shops and yard, Minneapolis
Soo Line dining car tray
Soo Line dining car tray
'Soo Line' sign
'Soo Line' sign
Soo Line wooded box cars at Shoreham Yards
Soo Line wooded box cars at Shoreham Yards
Herbert Paist's Soo Line pin
Herbert Paist's Soo Line pin

Turning Point

In 1887, the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie and Atlantic Railroad (later called the Soo Line) reaches the port of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, opening the first direct rail route from the grain markets of Minneapolis to the markets of the East.

Chronology

1883
Minneapolis businessmen found the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie and Atlantic Railroad.
1884
The railroad opens for business in June, with track running from Minneapolis into Wisconsin.
1887
The railroad reaches the port of Sault Ste. Marie in Michigan.
1888
It is renamed the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie, and Canadian Pacific Railway becomes a majority stock owner.
1909
The Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie takes over the Wisconsin Central Railway, signing a ninety-nine-year lease.
1944
The Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie emerges from bankruptcy after the Depression.
1961
It officially merges with the Wisconsin Central Railway and the Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railroad to form a new company, the Soo Line.
1968
The last Soo Line passenger train travels between Milwaukee and Calumet, Michigan, in March.
1985
The Soo Line buys one of its longtime competitors, the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific (known as the Milwaukee Road).
1987
A large part of the Soo Line spins off to form a new Wisconsin Central Railway.








  

Comments

I have a very good long story about my great great uncle Thomas Leonczak who lived in Lima Tnwshp, shovel lake minnesota who sued the soo line for being thrown off the soo line in 1915. If interested please contact me at chrisleonzal [at] gmail [dot] com