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Oil on canvas painting depicting Harriet Scott at Fort Snelling  by David Geister, 2013.

Harriet Scott at Fort Snelling

Harriet Scott at Fort Snelling, c.1837. Oil on canvas painting by David Geister, 2013.

Oil on canvas painting depicting Dred Scott at Fort Snelling by David Geister, 2013.

Dred Scott at Fort Snelling

Dred Scott at Fort Snelling, c.1837. Oil on canvas painting by David Geister, 2013.

Fort Snelling in the Expansionist Era, 1819–1858

The U.S. Army built Fort Snelling between 1820 and 1825 to protect American interests in the fur trade. It tasked the fort’s troops with deterring advances by the British in Canada, enforcing boundaries between the region’s American Indian nations, and preventing Euro-American immigrants from intruding on American Indian land. In these early years and until its temporary closure in 1858, Fort Snelling was a place where diverse people interacted and shaped the future state of Minnesota.

Black and white photograph of students at Gustavus Adolphus College c.1972.

Students at Gustavus Adolphus College

Students at Gustavus Adolphus College c.1972. Photographed by staff of the Gustavian Weekly student newspaper for an article published on December 8, 1972.

Black and white photograph of students at Gustavus Adolphus College c.1972.

Gustavus Adolphus students

Students at Gustavus Adolphus College c.1972. Photographed by staff of the Gustavian Weekly student newspaper for an article published on October 27, 1972.

Black and white photograph of Ron Ford, coordinator of the Black Student Organization at Gustavus Adolphus College in the 1970s.

Ron Ford

Ron Ford, coordinator of the Black Student Organization at Gustavus Adolphus College in the 1970s. Photographed by staff of the Gustavian Weekly student newspaper for an article published on December 8, 1972.

African American Students at Gustavus Adolphus College,1963–1982

Founded by Swedish Americans in St. Peter in 1862, Gustavus Adolphus College attracted a mostly white student body for much of its history. In the 1960s, the college took steps to diversify its campus by recruiting and retaining African American students from the South. This effort made Gustavus unique among Midwestern liberal arts colleges.

Black and white photograph of Iaweshowewekesik (Crossing the Sky), 1863. Iaweshowewekesik was a leader of the Gull and Rabbit Lake Ojibwe.

Iaweshowewekesik (Crossing the Sky)

Iaweshowewekesik (Crossing the Sky), 1863. Iaweshowewekesik was a leader of the Gull and Rabbit Lake Ojibwe.

Newspaper portrait of Clarence Wigington from the St. Paul Appeal, September 18, 1915.

Clarence Wigington, newly arrived in St. Paul

Portrait of Clarence Wigington from the St. Paul Appeal, September 18, 1915.

Black and white photograph of Clarence Wigington, c.1940s.

Clarence Wigington

Clarence Wigington, c.1940s.

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