Photograph of church choir members on the steps of St. Peter Claver.

African American choir of St. Peter Claver Church, St. Paul

Members of the St. Peter Claver Church Choir with their leader, Fr. John Andrzejewski, undated.

photograph of the altar and main aisle of St. Peter Claver

Interior, St. Peter Claver, St. Paul

Interior, St. Peter Claver Church, St. Paul, c.1916.

St. Peter Claver Church, St. Paul

Founded in 1888, St. Peter Claver Church was the first African American Catholic Church in Minnesota. The parish was created by St. Paul’s African American Catholic community and an Archbishop who vowed to “blot out the color line.”

1975 Photograph of Roy Wilkins, Samuel Richardson, Governor Wendell Anderson and an unidentified man.

Roy Wilkins (second from left) with Samuel Richardson (left), unidentified man, and Governor Wendell R. Anderson (far right)

Roy Wilkins (second from left) with Samuel Richardson (left), unidentified man, and Governor Wendell R. Anderson (far right), 1975.

Photograph of Martin Luther King, Roy Wilkins, and Thurgood Marshall

Roy Wilkins (center) with Martin Luther King and Thurgood Marshall

Roy Wilkins (center) with Martin Luther King and Thurgood Marshall, c.1959. Photograph by Cecil Layne.

Portrait photograph of Roy Wilkins

Roy Wilkins

Roy Wilkins, c.1955. Photograph by Fabian Bachrach.

Wilkins, Roy (1901–1981)

Roy Wilkins, who spent his formative years in the Twin Cities, led the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) from 1949 to 1977. During those years, the NAACP helped achieve the greatest civil rights advancements in U.S. history. Wilkins favored new laws and legal challenges as the best ways for blacks to gain civil rights.

Godfrey, Joseph (c.1830–1909)

The U.S.–Dakota War of 1862 was a turning point in Minnesota history. Joseph Godfrey, an escaped slave, joined the Dakota in their fight against white settlers that summer and fall. He was one of only two African Americans to do so.

William Bonga, Ojibway.

William Bonga, Ojibway.

William Bonga, George's son, c.1900.

Stephen Bonga

Stephen Bonga

Stephen Bonga, George's brother, c.1880.

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