Black and white photograph of St. John's Church at Indian agency near Morton

St. John's Church at Indian agency near Morton

This Episcopal Church was under construction at the Agency under the direction of Reverend Samuel Hinman when the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862 began. It was destroyed during the war.

Black and white photo print of Dakota Indian Treaty Delegation, c.1858.

Dakota Indian Treaty Delegation

Dakota Indian Treaty Delegation, c.1858. It was during these negotiations that the Dakota were forced into ceding half of their land along the Minnesota River.

Color image of the Lower Sioux Agency Warehouse, 2012

Lower Sioux Agency Warehouse

The Lower Sioux Agency warehouse, 2012. Photographed by Wikimedia Commons user McGhiever on August 31, 2012.

Lower Sioux Agency

The Lower Sioux Agency, or Redwood Agency, was built by the federal government in 1853 near the Redwood River in south-central Minnesota Territory. The Agency served as an administrative center for the Lower Sioux Reservation of Santee Dakota. It was also the site of key events related to the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862.

Color image of glass trade beads

Glass trade beads

Thirty-nine barrel-drawn, unevenly faceted glass beads created in the eighteenth or early nineteenth century.

Ayer, Elizabeth Taylor (1803–1898)

Elizabeth Taylor Ayer's life spanned nearly the entire nineteenth century. In an era when women rarely had professional careers, her work as a teaching missionary gave her more status and independence than most women enjoyed.

Black and white photograph of Ho-Chunk leader, Winneshiek II, likely at Fort Snelling, 1863

Winneshiek II, Ho-Chunk resistance leader

Ho-Chunk leader, Winneshiek II, likely at Fort Snelling, 1863. Winnesheik II led Ho-Chunk resistance against the treaty of 1859. His band was the last to submit to removal from Minnesota.

Black and white photograph of the Ho-Chunk leader Baptiste Lasallier wearing a mix of American Indian and Euro-American clothing, c.1855.

Baptiste Lasallier, Ho-Chunk leader

Black and white photograph of the Ho-Chunk leader Baptiste Lasallier wearing a mix of American Indian and Euro-American clothing, c.1855. After the treaty of 1859 the U.S. government recognized Lasallier as the "head chief" of the Ho-Chunk at Blue Earth.

Black and white photo print of the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) leader Baptiste Lasallier (center) with Indian Agent Charles H. Mix (right) and an Indian supply merchant from New York (left), 1857.

Baptiste Lasallier, Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) leader, with Charles H. Mix, Indian agent, and an Indian supply merchant from New York

Black and white photo print of the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) leader Baptiste Lasallier (center) with Indian Agent Charles H. Mix (right) and an Indian supply merchant from New York (left), 1857.

Black and white photo print of Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) Indian Agency, c. 1860.

Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) Indian Agency on the Owatonna Road near Mankato

Black-and-white photo print of the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) Indian Agency, c.1860.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - American Indians