Color image of American Indian pictographs at Lac La Croix in the BWCA, 1964.

American Indian pictographs at Lac La Croix

American Indian pictographs at Lac La Croix in the BWCA, 1964.

Flyer advertising an event held to celebrate the seventeenth anniversary of the founding of the American Indian Movement (AIM), 1985.

American Indian Movement flyer

Flyer advertising an event held to celebrate the seventeenth anniversary of the founding of the American Indian Movement (AIM), 1985.

American Indian Movement (AIM) patch commemorating the eighty-third anniversary of the Wounded Knee massacre in South Dakota, 1973.

American Indian Movement (AIM) patch

American Indian Movement (AIM) patch commemorating the eighty-third anniversary of the Wounded Knee massacre in South Dakota, 1973.

Postcard with photograph of AIM Patrol poster, 1991.

Postcard with photograph of AIM Patrol poster

Postcard with photograph of AIM Patrol poster, 1991. The postcard was sent to donors to the Cooperating Fund Drive in St. Paul.

Black and white photograph of AIM Patrol receiving donations, 1968.

AIM Patrol receiving donations

Five people look over cardboard boxes filled with supplies, September 14, 1968. Photograph by Roger Woo, courtesy of the American Indian Interpretative Center.

Black and white photograph of an AIM-organized Forum on Police Brutality, ca. 1968.

AIM-organized Forum on Police Brutality

A woman at a podium speaks into a microphone as audience members look on, ca. 1968. Photograph by Roger Woo, courtesy of the American Indian Movement Interpretative Center.

Black and white photograph of the first board members of the American Indian Movement (AIM), 1968.

First AIM Board, 1968

The first board members of the American Indian Movement (AIM), 1968. Photograph by Roger Woo, courtesy of the American Indian Movement Interpretative Center.

AIM Patrol, Minneapolis

Formed in August of 1968, the American Indian Movement Patrol (AIM Patrol) was a citizens’ patrol created in response to police brutality against American Indian people in Minneapolis. Patrollers observed officers’ interactions with American Indians and offered mediators that community members could call on for help. As of 2016, a similar but separate group operates under the same name.

Color image of American Indian women gathering rice, 1849–1855. Drawing by Seth Eastman.

Gathering wild rice

American Indian women gathering rice, 1849–1855. Drawing by Seth Eastman.This was an early version of one of Eastman’s paintings for the House Committee on Indian Affairs.

Eastman, Seth (1808–1875)

Seth Eastman was a painter and soldier best known for his depictions of the everyday life of Dakota and Ojibwe people around Fort Snelling in the 1840s. He stands out among other nineteenth-century American artists—particularly those who also painted American Indian people—because of his commitment to realism. Unlike his peers, Eastman mostly avoided romanticizing the Native people with whom he lived.

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