Black and white photograph of a Ho-Chunk woman sitting outside a shelter. Taken by Benjamin Franklin Upton in 1858.

Ho-Chunk woman and basswood wigwam

Black and white photograph of a Ho-Chunk woman sitting outside a shelter. Taken by Benjamin Franklin Upton in 1858.

Baptiste Lasallier, Ho-Chunk leader with Charles Mix, Indian Agent, and a trade merchant, 1857.

Baptiste Lasallier, Ho-Chunk leader with traders

Baptiste Lasallier, Ho-Chunk leader with Charles Mix, Indian Agent, and a trade merchant, 1857.

Black and white photograph of the Ho-Chunk leader Baptiste Lasallier wearing a mix of American Indian and Euro-American clothing, c.1855.

Baptiste Lasallier, Ho-Chunk leader

Black and white photograph of the Ho-Chunk leader Baptiste Lasallier wearing a mix of American Indian and Euro-American clothing, c.1855.

Black-and-white photograph of a Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) encampment taken by Whitney's Gallery, c.1865.

Ho-Chunk Encampment

Black-and-white photograph of a Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) encampment taken by Whitney's Gallery, c.1865.

The Ho-Chunk and Long Prairie, 1846–1855

In 1848 the U.S. government removed the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) from their reservation in the northeastern part of Iowa to Long Prairie in Minnesota Territory. The Ho-Chunk found the land at Long Prairie a poor choice to meet their needs as farmers. In 1855 they were moved again, this time to a reservation in southern Minnesota.

Water color painting of Little Crow’s Village on the Mississippi by Seth Eastman c.1846–1848.

Little Crow's Village on the Mississippi

Water color painting of Little Crow’s Village on the Mississippi by Seth Eastman c.1846–1848.

Illustration depicting an Ojibwe man named Kawetahsay reportedly wounded during the Battle of Shakopee.

Kawetahsay, shot in the mouth at the Battle of Shakopee, 1858

Illustration depicting an Ojibwe man named Kawetahsay reportedly wounded during the Battle of Shakopee, Saint Paul Globe, October 7, 1900.

Black-and-white photonegative of the site where the Dakota and Ojibwe fought the Battle of Shakopee in 1858.

Battle ground where the Dakota and Ojibwe fought the Battle of Shakopee in 1858

Black-and-white photonegative of the site where the Dakota and Ojibwe fought the Battle of Shakopee in 1858. Photographed c.1875 by William H. Jacoby.

Battle of Shakopee, 1858

The last in a long series of violent conflicts between Dakota and Ojibwe people took place on the banks of the Minnesota River north of the village of the Dakota leader Shakpedan (Little Six) on May 27, 1858. Dozens of Ojibwe and Dakota warriors engaged in fighting that claimed lives on both sides but produced no clear victor.

MN90: The controversial life and death of Chief Hole in the Day the Younger

Ojibwe Chief Hole in the Day the Younger (1827-1868) signed almost every land cession treaty between the Minnesota Ojibwe and the U.S. government. MN90 producer Marisa Helms reports that while the Chief was a controversial figure, he was also a very smart and effective negotiator. Still, the Chief had many enemies. On June 27, 1868, as he was traveling to Washington, D.C. to fight the removal of his people to a reservation at White Earth. Hole in the Day was assassinated by Ojibwe men from Leech Lake just a few miles from his home in Crow Wing.

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