Carver County

Carver County, founded in 1855, is home to the Minnesota and Crow Rivers, along with 125 lakes. Located southwest of the Twin Cities, it is part of the seven-county metro area.

Big Eagle, leader in the U.S.- Dakota War.

Wambditanka (Big Eagle)

Wambditanka (Jerome Big Eagle), c.1863.

Little Crow

Taoyateduta (Little Crow IV)

Taoyateduta (Little Crow IV), 1862.

Traverse des Sioux treaty marker.

Traverse des Sioux treaty marker.

A stone marking the site of the treaty, c.1950.

Camp at Traverse des Sioux

Camp at Traverse des Sioux

A drawing of the camp at the treaty negotiation site by Frank B. Mayer, 1851.

Treaty of Traverse des Sioux

Treaty of Traverse des Sioux

The painting of the treaty signing that hangs in the Governor's Reception Room of the Minnesota State Capitol.

Treaty of Traverse des Sioux

Treaty of Traverse des Sioux

Painting by Frank B. Mayer, a witness to the negotiations and signing of the Treaty of Traverse des Sioux. Painted in 1885.

Treaty of Traverse des Sioux

The Treaty of Traverse des Sioux of 1851 is an agreement between the Sisseton and Wahpeton bands of Dakota and the U.S. government. It transferred ownership of much of southern and western Minnesota from the Dakota to the United States. The treaty is significant in Minnesota's history because, along with similar treaties signed that same year, it opened twenty-four million acres of land to immigration. For the Dakota, these treaties marked another step in the process that saw them increasingly marginalized in and dismissed from land that was their home.

Godfrey, Joseph (c.1830–1909)

The U.S.–Dakota War of 1862 was a turning point in Minnesota history. Joseph Godfrey, an escaped slave, joined the Dakota in their fight against white settlers that summer and fall. He was one of only two African Americans to do so.

Bonga, George (c.1802–1874)

Fur trader and translator, George Bonga was one of the first black men born in what later became Minnesota. His mother was Ojibwe, as were both of his wives. Through these relationships, Bonga was part of the mixed racial and cultural groups that connected trading companies and American Indians. He frequently guided white immigrants and traders through the region. Comfortable in many worlds, Bonga often worked as an advocate for the Ojibwe in their dealings with trading companies and the government.

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