MN90: Inventing the Slider

MN90 producer Marisa Helms describes the life of Charles Albert Bender, born on the White Earth Reservation in northern Minnesota and later inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Includes an interview with Tom Swift, author of Chief Bender's Burden, published by the University of Nebraska Press, 2010.

Minnesota's first two American Indian nurses

Minnesota's first two American Indian nurses

Minnesota's first two American Indian nurses, Elizabeth Sherer and Josephine Parisien, c.1925. The Minnesota Department of Health started a Chippewa Nursing Service in 1923, hiring American Indian nurses to provide public health nursing services on reservations in northern Minnesota.

MN90: Send it by Sled Dog

In the 1850s, mail service on Minnesota's North Shore was notoriously unreliable. That is, until John Beargrease and his team of sled dogs began running mail between Two Harbors and Grand Marais. MN90 Producer Andi McDaniel learns about the man who inspired the annual John Beargrease Sled Dog Marathon.

Ojibwe men, possibly at 1857 or 1862 treaty signing

Ojibwe men, possibly at 1857 or 1862 treaty signing

Ojibwe men, possibly at 1857 or 1862 treaty signing in Washington, DC. Photographer: Matthew B. Brady. To make way for the farm, the land first needed to be alienated from native peoples. Treaty negotiations started this process.

Beargrease, John (1858–1910)

The US Congress ordered the beginning of mail service from Superior to Grand Portage, Minnesota, in 1855, but service was spotty. John Beargrease and his brothers came to the rescue. They began covering a regular mail route between Two Harbors and Grand Marais in 1879.

Bender, Charles Albert (1884–1954)

The National Baseball Hall of Fame credits Charles Albert Bender with inventing the slider, a curveball with extra speed. Like his patented pitch, Bender's life course was a circuitous one, beginning on the White Earth Reservation in northern Minnesota.

Frances Densmore with Susan Windgrow

Frances Densmore with Susan Windgrow

Red Wing ethnologist Frances Densmore examines a moccasin made by her Dakota friend Susan Windgrow (Good Bear Woman), c.1930. Densmore also preserved a nationally important collection of American Indian songs by recording them on wax cylinders, beginning in 1906.

Ojibwe Indians standing by bull rush wigwam

Ojibwe Indians standing by bull rush wigwam

Ojibwe people standing by a bull rush wigwam, c.1910.

Hiawatha and Minnehaha, by Jacob Fjelde

Jacob Fjelde's sculpture Hiawatha and Minnehaha has stood in Minnehaha Park in Minneapolis since the early twentieth century. Now a popular fixture of the park, its placement there was originally controversial.

Eastman, Charles Alexander (Ohiyesa), (1858–1939)

Famed author and lecturer Charles Eastman was raised in a traditional Dakota manner until age fifteen, when he entered Euro-American culture at his father's request. He spent the rest of his life moving between American Indian and white American worlds, achieving renown but never financial security.

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