Black and white photograph of an Ojibwe family in canoe on Lake Vermilion, ca. 1905.

Ojibwe family in canoe on Lake Vermilion

Ojibwe family in canoe on Lake Vermilion, ca. 1905.

Minnesota Public School Fund

In 1854, the United States took the mineral-rich lands of northeastern Minnesota Territory from the Ojibwe Nation after the signing of the Treaty of La Pointe. Four years later, it granted to the new state of Minnesota sections 16 and 36 of every one of its townships, either to be held in trust or leased to support state schools. Close to three million acres were dedicated to a public school trust fund, and the iron ore and forest lands of the Ojibwe generated over 85 percent of its value. In 2017, it is worth over a billion dollars.

Color image of American Indian pictographs at Lac La Croix in the BWCA, 1964.

American Indian pictographs at Lac La Croix

American Indian pictographs at Lac La Croix in the BWCA, 1964.

Flyer advertising an event held to celebrate the seventeenth anniversary of the founding of the American Indian Movement (AIM), 1985.

American Indian Movement flyer

Flyer advertising an event held to celebrate the seventeenth anniversary of the founding of the American Indian Movement (AIM), 1985.

American Indian Movement (AIM) patch commemorating the eighty-third anniversary of the Wounded Knee massacre in South Dakota, 1973.

American Indian Movement (AIM) patch

American Indian Movement (AIM) patch commemorating the eighty-third anniversary of the Wounded Knee massacre in South Dakota, 1973.

Postcard with photograph of AIM Patrol poster, 1991.

Postcard with photograph of AIM Patrol poster

Postcard with photograph of AIM Patrol poster, 1991. The postcard was sent to donors to the Cooperating Fund Drive in St. Paul.

Black and white photograph of AIM Patrol receiving donations, 1968.

AIM Patrol receiving donations

Five people look over cardboard boxes filled with supplies, September 14, 1968. Photograph by Roger Woo, courtesy of the American Indian Interpretative Center.

Black and white photograph of an AIM-organized Forum on Police Brutality, ca. 1968.

AIM-organized Forum on Police Brutality

A woman at a podium speaks into a microphone as audience members look on, ca. 1968. Photograph by Roger Woo, courtesy of the American Indian Movement Interpretative Center.

Black and white photograph of the first board members of the American Indian Movement (AIM), 1968.

First AIM Board, 1968

The first board members of the American Indian Movement (AIM), 1968. Photograph by Roger Woo, courtesy of the American Indian Movement Interpretative Center.

AIM Patrol, Minneapolis

Formed in August of 1968, the American Indian Movement Patrol (AIM Patrol) was a citizens’ patrol created in response to police brutality against American Indian people in Minneapolis. Patrollers observed officers’ interactions with American Indians and offered mediators that community members could call on for help. As of 2016, a similar but separate group operates under the same name.

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