Black and white photograph of two Dakota women at the Fort Snelling concentration camp, c.1862–1863. Photograph by Joel Emmons Whitney.

Dakota Women at Fort Snelling concentration camp

Two Dakota women at the Fort Snelling concentration camp, c.1862–1863. Photograph by Joel Emmons Whitney.

Black and white photograph of the the Dakota concentration camp on the river flats below Fort Snelling, c.1862–1863.

Dakota concentration camp below Fort Snelling

View of the Dakota concentration camp on the river flats below Fort Snelling, c.1862–1863. Photograph by Benjamin Franklin Upton.

Black and white photograph of Treaty Delegation, 1858.

Joseph R. Brown and Dakota delegation

Participants in the Treaty of Washington, including Henry Belland, Joseph Renshaw Brown, Nathaniel R. Brown, Antoine Joseph Campbell, and the Dakota leaders Wabasha and Mankato, 1858. Photographed by Charles DeForest Fredericks.

Black and white photograph of Hazel Belvo, George Morrison, and their son, Briand Morrison, c.1978.

Hazel Belvo, George Morrison, and their son, Briand Morrison

Hazel Belvo, George Morrison, and their son, Briand Morrison, c.1978. Photograph by Victor Bloomfield.

Black and white photograph of George Morrison and Hazel Belvo, 1976.

George Morrison and Hazel Belvo

Morrison and Hazel Belvo, 1976. Photograph by Victor Bloomfield.

Morrison, George (1919–2000)

George Morrison, one of Minnesota’s most important artists, is best known for his landscape paintings and wood collages. He drew inspiration from nature, combining impressionism with expressionism, cubism, and surrealism to develop a uniquely textured style. He referred to himself as a formalist in his approach to art.

Graphite drawing of Fort Snelling showing landing road with root cellars beneath it and Dakota Indians in the foreground, c.1856. Drawing by B. C. H.

Sketch of Fort Snelling

Graphite drawing of Fort Snelling showing landing road with root cellars beneath it and Dakota Indians in the foreground, c.1856. Drawing by B. C. H.

Fort Snelling in the Expansionist Era, 1819–1858

The U.S. Army built Fort Snelling between 1820 and 1825 to protect American interests in the fur trade. It tasked the fort’s troops with deterring advances by the British in Canada, enforcing boundaries between the region’s American Indian nations, and preventing Euro-American immigrants from intruding on American Indian land. In these early years and until its temporary closure in 1858, Fort Snelling was a place where diverse people interacted and shaped the future state of Minnesota.

Color print of the Dakota leader Ishtakhaba (Sleepy Eye)

Ishtakhaba (Sleepy Eye)

Print of the Dakota leader Ishtakhaba (Sleepy Eye), 1987. Print by Tre-Mar Photography

Military Land Warrants in Minnesota, 1854–1863

State militia soldiers fought many wars against Britain, Mexico, and American Indian nations to take land for the United States. The federal government rewarded them with military land warrants—certificates that could be redeemed for up to 160 acres of U.S. public land. The warrants were quickly sold and then traded on Wall Street to land agents in the country’s western territories. The agents made huge profits from selling and loaning them to struggling farmers. In Minnesota, German immigrants used land warrants to buy Dakota land, start farms, and found the town of New Ulm.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - American Indians