Ojibwe tanned deer hide

Ojibwe tanned deer hide

Tanned deer hide made by Ojibwe Indians, date unknown.

Photograph of Ojibwe women gathering wild rice c.1885.

Ojibwe women gathering wild rice

Photograph of Ojibwe women gathering wild rice. Photographed by Charles A. Zimmerman, c.1885.

How the Ojibwe Have Shaped the State

Our Historical Role in Influencing Contemporary Minnesota

Expert Essay: Thomas D. Peacock, member of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe and author of many books and articles on Ojibwe history and culture, reflects on the Ojibwe influence on Minnesota, from language, literature, and the arts to education, economics, and politics.

Meyer, Roy Willard (1925–2007)

Roy W. Meyer's studies of the Dakota and United States policies dealing with them brought about thoughtful public conversation during the late 1960s and 1970s, a time of social turmoil in the country.

Painting of Father Louis Hennepin at the Falls of St. Anthony, 1680

Hennepin at the Falls of St. Anthony, 1680

Painting of Father Louis Hennepin at the Falls of St. Anthony in 1680. Painted c. 1903 by J. N. Marchand.

Painting of Father Hennepin at the Falls of St. Anthony by Douglas Volk, c. 1905.

Father Hennepin at the Falls of St. Anthony

Painting of Father Louis Hennepin at St. Anthony Falls by Douglas Volk, c.1905.

Hennepin, Louis (c.1640–c.1701)

Father Louis Hennepin, a Recollect friar, is best known as an early explorer of Minnesota. He gained fame in the seventeenth century with the publication of his dramatic stories of the exploration of the Mississippi River. Father Hennepin spent only a few months in Minnesota, but his influence is undeniable. While his widely read travel accounts were more fiction than fact, they allowed Hennepin to leave a lasting mark on the state.

Circular explaining the location of "half-breed" Dakota scrip, March 21, 1857.

Circular explaining the location of "half-breed" Dakota scrip

Initial page of a circular distributed by the General Land Office and dated March 21, 1857. The circular explains how land will be divided among the "Dacotah or Sioux Half-breeds or Mixed-bloods" following the act approved by Congress on July 17, 1854.

Petition sent by members of the Sioux Nation to Joel Roberts Poinsett

Petition sent by members of the Sioux Nation to Joel Roberts Poinsett

Initial page of a petition sent by members of the Sioux (Dakota) Nation to U.S. Secretary of War Joel Roberts Poinsett in September of 1838. The petition's writers urge the secretary to divide the land within the Lake Pepin Half-Breed Reserve into plots so that individual titles may be awarded.

Black and white engraving on paper depicting Lake Pepin. Made by Jacob C. Ward c.1840.

Lake Pepin, Upper Mississippi

Black and white engraving on paper depicting Lake Pepin. Made by Jacob C. Ward c.1840.

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