photograph of a lace doily featuring a tipi motif

Bobbin lace doily with teepee motif

Tape lace linen doily; square with tape work in teepee motif at center, joined by braids decorated with picots. Doily includes woven spider fillings and tape lace border.

photograph of a Battenberg lace table cover

Battenberg lace table cover

Battenberg lace linen table cover. Circular net center with Battenberg lace edging. Tape work is joined with needle made spiders and eyelets with needle made buttonhole stitch and mesh fillings. Made at the lace school of the Bishop Whipple Mission, Morton, MN.

photograph of lace makers and their lace

Lace makers at Morton.

Lace makers at Morton.

photograph of a young woman displaying bobbin lace

Janette (Jeannette) Crooks displaying Battenberg lace piece

Janette (Jeannette) Crooks displaying Battenberg lace piece, c. 1900.

photograph of a round lace doily

Dakota round lace doily

Lace doily made by Dakota women at Birch Coulee Mission, possibly as a result of the lace-making school, c.1890-1920.

Photograph of four lace makers at the Redwood Mission in Morton, Minnesota

Lace Makers at the Redwood Mission, Morton

Lace Makers at the Redwood Mission, Morton, 1897.

photograph of lace makers working outdoors at the Leech Lake Reservation

Lace makers at Leech Lake

Lace makers at Leech Lake, 1906.

Portrait photograph of Sybil Carter

Sybil Carter

Sybil Carter, c. 1890.

Photograph of Sybil Carter and Indian lace makers at Birch Coulee

Sybil Carter with instructors and lace makers at Birch Coulee

Sybil Carter with instructors and lace makers at Birch Coulee, c. 1896

The Sybil Carter Indian Lace Association

When Sybil Carter started her first lace-making classes at the White Earth Reservation, she set the stage for a major economic enterprise. In 1904, friends of Carter organized the Sybil Carter Indian Lace Association to help ship and market lace made by women on reservations to East Coast consumers. The association provided a good source of income to American Indian women. However, the association also held negative views of American Indian women and excluded them from leadership roles.

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