At the Foot of the Mountain Theater, Minneapolis

The women's theater movement began in the early 1970s and continued until the mid–1980s. Echoing the second-wave feminism sweeping the country, it fostered the growth of more than 185 theaters, with an emphasis on women's issues. One of these, At the Foot of the Mountain Theater in Minneapolis, made a lasting mark on the Twin Cities.

Map of locations important to the early 1800s fur trade in present-day Minnesota and Wisconsin. Drawn by David Geister, ca. 2000.

Map of the region around the North West Fur Post

Map of locations important to the early 1800s fur trade in present-day Minnesota and Wisconsin. The North West Fur Post (Sayer's post) is visible in the lower left. Drawn by David Geister, ca. 2000.

The North West Fur Post as it appeared during John Sayer's tenure as partner in the early nineteenth century. Drawn by David Geister, ca. 2000.

Drawing of North West Fur Post

The North West Fur Post as it appeared during John Sayer's tenure as partner in the early nineteenth century. Drawn by David Geister, ca. 2000.

Black and white photograph of Seth Eastman late in his life, ca.1873.

Seth Eastman late in his life

Seth Eastman late in his life, ca.1873.

Color image of Seth Eastman’s design for the Minnesota Territorial seal, ca. 1849.

Design for Minnesota Territorial seal

Seth Eastman’s design for the Minnesota Territorial seal, ca. 1849.

Color image of American Indian women gathering rice, 1849–1855. Drawing by Seth Eastman.

Gathering wild rice

American Indian women gathering rice, 1849–1855. Drawing by Seth Eastman.This was an early version of one of Eastman’s paintings for the House Committee on Indian Affairs.

Color image of Owamniyomni (St. Anthony Falls), 1848. Oil painting by Seth Eastman.

Owamniyomni (St. Anthony Falls)

Owamniyomni (St. Anthony Falls), 1848. Oil painting by Seth Eastman.

Eastman, Seth (1808–1875)

Seth Eastman was a painter and soldier best known for his depictions of the everyday life of Dakota and Ojibwe people around Fort Snelling in the 1840s. He stands out among other nineteenth-century American artists—particularly those who also painted American Indian people—because of his commitment to realism. Unlike his peers, Eastman mostly avoided romanticizing the Native people with whom he lived.

Black and white photograph of a children's theater group at the Phyllis Wheatley House, ca. 1960.

Children's theater group at the Phyllis Wheatley House

Children's theater group at the Phyllis Wheatley House, ca. 1960.

Black and white photograph of the Wheatley Aires, Phyllis Wheatley Community Center, ca. 1950.

The Wheatley Aires, Phyllis Wheatley Community Center

The Wheatley Aires, Phyllis Wheatley Community Center, ca. 1950.

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