Black and white photograph of Marge McKenzie, Louise Hiller, and Charles Hiller at the Grand Theater, ca. 1940s.

Marge McKenzie, Louise Hiller, and Charles Hiller

Marge McKenzie, Louise Hiller, and Charles Hiller at the Grand Theater, ca. 1940s.

Black and white photograph of Charles and Louise Hiller sitting in theater seats, ca. 1940s.

Charles and Louise Hiller in the Grand Theater

Charles and Louise Hiller sitting in theater seats, ca. 1940s.

Black and white photograph of Louise Hiller, ca. 1915.

Louise Hiller

Louise Hiller, ca. 1915.

Black and white photograph of the Grand Theater, 1913.

Grand Theater, 1913

The Grand Theater, 1913.

Black and white photograph of the Children at a Christmas matinee at the Grand Theater, ca. 1950s.

Children’s matinee at the Grand Theater

Children at a Christmas matinee at the Grand Theater, ca. 1950s.

Grand Theater, Crookston

For over one hundred years, the Grand Theater of Crookston has kept up with the times, transforming itself from a venue for vaudeville and plays to a movie palace for silent films and, finally, “talkies.” By evolving to keep up with technology and the demands of the public, the Grand has remained a vital part of Crookston community life.

Black and white photograph of firefighters battling the flames in the Opera House Block in 1987.

Opera House Block firefighters

Firefighters battle the flames in the Opera House Block in 1987.

Black and white photograph of Director Arthur Wasshausen leading the Citizens Band in Crookston's opera house in 1907.

Citizens Band performance at the Crookston opera house

Director Arthur Wasshausen leads the Citizens Band in Crookston's opera house in 1907.

An advertisement in the Crookston Weekly Times for the opening night performance at the Opera House Block on April 13–15, 1891, featuring the Hess Opera Company.

Opening night

An advertisement in the Crookston Weekly Times for the opening night performance at the Opera House Block on April 13–15, 1891, featuring the Hess Opera Company.

Black and white photograph of Mark Twain on railroad in Crookston, 1895.

Mark Twain on railroad in Crookston

Mark Twain’s early morning train out of Crookston on July 30, 1895, was delayed by forty-five minutes, leaving him annoyed. He used that extra time to board a baggage truck and have his manager, J. B. Pond, push him up and down the platform.

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