Color photograph of Split Rock Lighthouse, c.2000

Split Rock Lighthouse

Split Rock Lighthouse Station. Photographed by Dennis Adams of the Federal Highway Administration c.2000.

Split Rock Lighthouse

Split Rock Lighthouse opened in the summer of 1910 to guide bulk ore ships sailing near Lake Superior's rocky coast. By 1940, its picturesque North Shore setting had made it one of the most visited lighthouses in the United States.

Black and white photograph of Foshay and Henry H. Henley in Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary, 1934.

Wilbur Foshay with his associate Henry H. Henley, prisoners at Leavenworth Prison following their conviction on mail fraud; shown here working to obtain a pardon

Foshay with his associate Henry H. Henley are photographed at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary following their conviction on mail fraud, 1934.

Black and white photograph of Foshay and Henry H. Henley facing charges of mail fraud, 1931.

Wilbur B. Foshay (right) and Henry H. Henley, facing arraignment on charges of mail fraud

Foshay (right) and Henry H. Henley face arraignment on charges of mail fraud, 1931. Photographed by the Minneapolis Star Journal.

Black-and-white photograph of Wilbur Foshay and his wife Leota.

Portrait of Wilbur B. Foshay and his wife Leota

Wilbur Foshay and wife Leota pose for a photograph.

Black and white portrait of Wilbur Burton Foshay, 1929.

Wilbur B. Foshay

Wilbur Burton Foshay, 1929.

Foshay, Wilbur (1881–1957)

In 1932, singer Bing Crosby had a major hit with his recording of E. Y. Harburg and Jay Gorney's song "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" Its lyrics could have been the story of Wilbur B. Foshay: "Once I built a tower up to the sun/ brick and rivet and lime/ Once I built a tower, now it's done/ Brother, can you spare a dime?" Foshay built a fortune, built a tower in Minneapolis—and then lost it all in the stock market crash of 1929.

Black and white photograph of Foshay Tower and IDS Center, Minneapolis, 1975.

Foshay Tower and IDS Center, Minneapolis

The Philip Johnson-designed IDS Center, seen behind the Foshay, supplanted the Foshay Tower as Minneapolis's tallest building when it opened in 1972.

Black and white photograph of Foshay Tower at Ninth Street and Marquette, Minneapolis, 1958

Foshay Tower at Ninth Street and Marquette, Minneapolis

The tower was built upon an existing two-story structure, which formed the base of the new skyscraper, 1958.

Black and white photograph of the elevator to Foshay Tower observation balcony, Minneapolis, 1948.

Elevator to Foshay Tower observation balcony, Minneapolis

Elevator to Foshay Tower observation balcony, Minneapolis, 1948.

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