Women working in the Hormel plant in Austin, Minnesota

Women working in the Hormel plant in Austin, Minnesota

Women working in the Hormel plant in Austin, Minnesota carry out quality-control tests on cans of SPAM. Printed in Life 7, no. 19 (November 6, 1939), page 58.

Magazine advertisement for SPAM, 1939

Magazine advertisement for SPAM printed in Life 7, no. 19 (November 6, 1939), page 56.

World War II-era can of SPAM

World War II-era can of SPAM

Can of SPAM manufactured between 1941 and 1945.

Minnesota State Lottery tickets featuring SPAM

A strip of unused, voided scratch-off tickets from the Minnesota State Lottery game sponsored by Hormel (and featuring SPAM), 2000.

Minnesota State Lottery game featuring SPAM

Minnesota State Lottery game featuring SPAM

Paper sheet with game rules and information on winning odds for the Minnesota State Lottery game sponsored by Hormel (and featuring SPAM), 2000.

SPAM can furniture

Recycled tin cans converted into doll furniture. Items include a rocking chair, armchair, and loveseat. All three seats are covered with red cushions. The chairs were made from round cans; the love seat was made from a SPAM can. Purchased in Austin, Minnesota, ca. 1965.

A meat processor at the Hormel Company

A meat processor at the Hormel Company, Austin, Minnesota, ca. 1955.

Hormel packing plant

Hormel packing plant

Hormel packing plant, Austin, Minnesota, ca. 1932.

Jay Catherwood Hormel

Jay Catherwood Hormel

Jay Catherwood Hormel of Austin, Minnesota, president of the Hormel Packing Company, ca. 1923.

SPAM

In 1937, the George A. Hormel Company, a meat-packing business in Austin, Minnesota, introduced SPAM luncheon meat to use up an excess of pork shoulder in their inventory. In the eighty years since its introduction, SPAM has fed millions of people and is available in more than forty countries and in over fifteen varieties and sizes.

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