The Relocation of Hibbing, 1919–1921

From 1919 to 1921, the people of Hibbing moved nearly two hundred structures, including several large buildings, two miles south to make way for a growing open pit mine. The Oliver Mining Company wanted the valuable iron ore underneath North Hibbing, and the company funded the use of horses, logs, farm tractors, a steam crawler (a tractor primarily used in the logging industry), steel cables, and human power to relocate the town.

Street view after cyclone, Rochester.

Street view after cyclone, Rochester.

Street view after cyclone, Rochester.

A Broadway residence after cyclone, Rochester.

A Broadway residence after cyclone, Rochester.

A Broadway residence after cyclone, Rochester.

Aftermath of cyclone, Rochester.

Aftermath of cyclone, Rochester.

Aftermath of cyclone, Rochester. Photo by Elmer & Tenney, August 21, 1883.

Straws driven into wood, Rochester cyclone.

Straws driven into wood, Rochester cyclone.

Straws driven into wood, Rochester cyclone. Photo by J. C. Cook, August 21, 1883.

Ruins of Weber's residence after cyclone, Rochester.

Ruins of Weber's residence after cyclone, Rochester.

Ruins of Weber's residence after cyclone, Rochester. Stereograph by J. C. Cook, August 21, 1883.

Cyclone damage, Rochester.

Cyclone damage, Rochester.

Cyclone damage, Rochester. Stereograph by Charles E. Tenney, August 21, 1883.

Rochester cyclone.

Rochester cyclone.

Rochester cyclone. Photo by Charles A. Tenney, August 21, 1883.

Elevator after cyclone, Rochester.

Elevator after cyclone, Rochester.

Elevator after cyclone, Rochester. Photographed by Elmer & Tenney, August 21, 1883.

Cole's Mill after cyclone, Rochester.

Cole's Mill after cyclone, Rochester.

Cole's Mill after cyclone, Rochester. Photographed by Elmer & Tenney, August 21, 1883. At Cole's Mill, eight cars of flour were overturned, the west end of the mill was blown in, machinery was blown about, and the roof was blown off.

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