Black and white photograph of 4th Ave S at 37th St, 1957.

4th Ave S at 37th St, Minneapolis

4th Ave S at 37th St, Minneapolis, 1957.

Southside African American Community, Minneapolis

Minneapolis historically has been home to a small but vibrant African American population. From the 1930s to the 1970s, an African American neighborhood flourished on the city’s Southside, between East Thirty-Fourth and Forty-Sixth Streets and from Nicollet Avenue to Chicago Avenue.

Keck, Bert D. (1876–1962)

Bert D. Keck was an architect who moved to Crookston, Minnesota, in 1902. His Neo-classical and Romanesque designs for Crookston’s costliest and most significant public buildings changed the skyline of the town. Three of his structures are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Color image of a sign welcoming visitors to the city of Morton, 2016. The sign is made out of Morton gneiss. Photograph by Paul Nelson.

Sign welcoming visitors to the city of Morton

Sign welcoming visitors to the city of Morton, 2016. The sign is made out of Morton gneiss. Photograph by Paul Nelson.

Map of St. Paul in 1839

Map of St. Paul in 1839

Map of St. Paul in 1839. Created by Mary Brueggemann. Used with the permission of Gary Brueggemann, in whose book, Minnesota’s First Murder Mystery (Beaver’s Pond Press, 2013), the map originally appeared.

Black and white photograph of the present-day Site of the Hays–Phelan cabin, ca. 2000s.

Site of the Hays–Phelan cabin

Site of the Hays–Phelan cabin, between the later sites of Eagle Street Plaza and the Science Museum of Minnesota. In the background, the Civic Center Parking Ramp. Used with the permission of Gary Brueggemann, in whose book, Minnesota’s First Murder Mystery (Beaver’s Pond Press, 2013), the map originally appeared.

Drawn portrait of Pierre Parrant, ca. 1840.

Pierre Parrant

The only known image of Pierre Parrant, Phelan’s neighbor and first known European to reside in the future St. Paul, ca. 1840.

Black and white photograph of Benjamin and Genevieve Gervais, ca. 1875. They were Phelan’s nearest neighbors and the first to hear from him of Hays’s disappearance.

Benjamin and Genevieve Gervais

Benjamin and Genevieve Gervais, ca. 1875. They were Phelan’s nearest neighbors and the first to hear from him of Hays’s disappearance.

The village of St. Paul, 1844. Etching by Charles William Post.

The village of St. Paul

The village of St. Paul, 1844. Etching by Charles William Post.

Murder of John Hays

The first murder to reach the courts of what would become Minnesota took place during the early infancy of St. Paul, in the late summer of 1839. Though both victim and main suspect were quickly identified, the case was never solved.

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