Color image of four small beads from 2009 excavation and one larger bead from 2010.

Glass beads from 2009–2010 excavations

Four small beads from 2009 excavation and one larger bead from 2010 excavations by Dr. Katherine Hayes. Photograph by Don Hoffman.

Color image of artifacts metal detected by a relic collector prior to 1972 and identified as an iron ferule, a piece of fire steel, a rosehead nail, a fragment from the bottom of a kettle, and an axe head.

Artifacts metal detected at Little Round Hill

Photograph of artifacts metal detected by a relic collector prior to 1972 and identified as an iron ferule, a piece of fire steel, a rosehead nail, a fragment from the bottom of a kettle, and an axe head. Printed in Birk, Douglas A., "A Preliminary Study of the Little Round Hill Site, Old Wadena Park, Wadena County, Minnesota." Institute for Minnesota Archaeology, Reports of Investigation, no. 214, 1992, fig. 3.

Site map of Little Round Hill, 2104.

Site map of Little Round Hill

Sketch of Little Round Hill site with excavation units and shovel test plots indicated. Printed in Katherine Hayes’ “Results of Survey and Excavation of the Little Round Hill (2WD16) and Cadotte Post (21WD17) Sites in Wadena County, Minnesota: A View of the Fur Trade in the Late Eighteenth Century,” a report prepared for the Wadena County Historical Society, 2014.

Site map of Little Round Hill, 1992.

Map of Little Round Hill site

The Little Round Hill site, surface features, and IMA 1992 excavations. Printed in Douglas A. Birk’s “A Preliminary Study of the Little Round Hill Site, Old Wadena Park, Wadena County, Minnesota. Institute for Minnesota Archaeology.”

Little Round Hill Trading Site

Ojibwe oral tradition identifies Little Round Hill, a small elevation on the banks of the Crow Wing River, as the location of a late-1700s French trading fort and a skirmish between Ojibwe hunter-traders and Dakota warriors. Located in Old Wadena County Park at the confluence of the Partridge and Crow Wing Rivers, it was the site of the first intensive archaeological excavation within Wadena County.

Google map of the Cadotte Post site with overlay of Douglas Birk’s 1972 sketch and an approximation of the location of the survey grid.

Map of Cadotte Post site

Google map of the Cadotte Post site with overlay of Douglas Birk’s 1972 sketch and an approximation of the location of the survey grid. From, Hayes, Katherine. Results of Survey and Excavation of the Little Round Hill (2WD16) and Cadotte Post (21WD17) Sites in Wadena County, Minnesota: A View of the Fur Trade in the Late Eighteenth Century. Report prepared for the Wadena County Historical Society, 2014.

Cadotte Trading Post

The Cadotte Post was a fur trade encampment in the late eighteenth century—one of three archaeological sites in Wadena County identified through Ojibwe oral tradition as a late-1700s trading fort. It stood just north of the Crow Wing River on its east bank, south and opposite the mouth of the Leaf River in what later became the Old Wadena County Park.

Color image of the excavation unit at Réaume site, 2011.

Excavation unit at Réaume site

Excavation unit at Réaume site, 2012. Graduate students in archaeology from the University of Minnesota investigated 26 excavation units and over 100 shovel test pits during 2011–2012. Photograph by Amélie Allard.

Joseph Réaume's Trading Post

Wadena County contains three known fur trade sites. One is located on private property along the Leaf River where Joseph Réaume, an independent fur trader, set up a winter camp in the late eighteenth century. Between 2011 and 2012, the University of Minnesota conducted archaeological surveys and excavations at this location. They confirmed a late-eighteenth century occupation, validating its association with Réaume's 1792 wintering activities.

Color scan of a map of the Territory of the United States from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean, G. K. Warren, 1858.

Map of the Territory of the United States

Map of the Territory of the United States from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean, G. K. Warren, 1858.

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