Color photograph of monument marking the northwest point of Lake of the Woods on Rose Island.

Lake of the Woods boundary marker

Photograph of reference monument 44, Rose Island, Lake of the Woods. The monument marks the northwest point of Lake of the Woods on Rose Island. Photographed by William E. Lass on May 23, 1972.

Color photograph of a Northwest angle marker and author William E. Lass provides a sense of the marker's scale, 1972.

Northwest Angle marker

Photograph of William E. Lass at boundary monument 925, looking north to the northwest corner of Lake of the Woods. This is the northernmost marker on the meridian strip between Buffalo Bay and Northwest Angle Inlet. Photographed by William E. Lass on May 23, 1972.

Map of North America drawn by John Mitchell in 1755.

John Mitchell Map of North America

Map of North America drawn by John Mitchell in 1755.

Color Map of the Northwest Angle

Map of the Northwest Angle

Map showing the size and location of the Northwest Angle relative to surrounding bodies of water and political divisions, including those demarcating Manitoba, Ontario, and Minnesota.

The Northwest Angle

Minnesota's Northwest Angle in Lake of the Woods is farther north than any other part of the contiguous United States. Logically, it would seem that this area of about 123 square miles should be in Canada. But this oddest feature of the entire U.S.–Canada boundary was the proper result of American treaties negotiated with Great Britain.

Oil on canvas painting of Giacomo Beltrami. Painted in 1931 by Gian Antonio Micheli.

Giacomo Costantino Beltrami

Oil on canvas painting of Giacomo Beltrami. Painted in 1931 by Gian Antonio Micheli.

Beltrami, Giacomo Costantino (1779–1855)

Born in 1779 in the Lombardy region of Italy, Giacomo Costantino Beltrami achieved fame and fortune at a young age. When political pressure and personal loss spurred him to leave home, he set out to explore the world. Today he is best known for an account of his travels through present-day Minnesota, and for his claim to have found the source of the Mississippi River.

Hennepin, Louis (c.1640–c.1701)

Father Louis Hennepin, a Recollect friar, is best known as an early explorer of Minnesota. He gained fame in the seventeenth century with the publication of his dramatic stories of the exploration of the Mississippi River. Father Hennepin spent only a few months in Minnesota, but his influence is undeniable. While his widely read travel accounts were more fiction than fact, they allowed Hennepin to leave a lasting mark on the state.

Greysolon, Daniel, Sieur du Lhut (c.1639–1710)

Daniel Greysolon, Sieur du Lhut, was born in Lyons, France around 1639. Greysolon was a nobleman, and quickly rose to prominence in the French royal court. He traveled to New France (Quebec, Canada) in 1674 at the age of thirty-eight to command the French marines in Montreal.

Carver, Jonathan (1710–1780)

Jonathan Carver was an explorer, mapmaker, author, and subject of controversy. He was among the first white men to explore and map areas of Minnesota, and including what later became Carver County. While French explorers had been in the area earlier, they did not leave behind detailed maps or journals of their travels as Carver did.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Exploration