Connemara Patch

Connemara Patch began as a community of Irish immigrants on St. Paul’s East Side in the early 1880s. An unintended result of Bishop John Ireland’s Catholic colonization efforts and a victim of 1950s freeway construction, it was a small, swampy neighborhood on the banks of Phalen Creek. Despite its short and oft-forgotten existence, Connemara Patch was home to several generations of Irish working-class families and later immigrant groups.

Jake Greenberg's relief registration form

Jake Greenberg's relief registration form

Relief registration form for Jake Greenberg, 1894. From the records of the Minnesota State Commission for the Relief of Fire Sufferers, 1894–1895 (State Archives Collection, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul).

Probstfield, Randolph M. (1832–1911)

Randolph M. Probstfield is commonly considered Clay County’s first European settler-colonist. A farmer in the Red River Valley, he was a local leader in politics, education, and agricultural development from his arrival in Minnesota in 1859 until his death in 1911.

Miss Miyazaki Japanese Friendship Doll

Concerned by the anti-Japanese atmosphere in the United States in the 1920s, Dr. Sidney Gulick established the Committee on World Friendship Among Children and began sending friendship dolls to Japan. Japan reciprocated by sending friendship dolls to the US in 1927, with Minnesota receiving a doll known as "Miss Miyazaki."

Hutterian Brethren, Cottonwood County

South Dakota Hutterite families with roots in the Anabaptist Reformation of the sixteenth-century moved to Cottonwood County in 1994. There, they established the Neuhof Hutterian Brethren Colony and the Elmendorf Hutterian Brethren Colony south of Mountain Lake, Minnesota.

Dora Decker and Amos Decker Sr.

Dora Decker and Amos Decker Sr.

Dora Decker and Amos Decker Sr., some of the first residents of Neuhof Hutterian Brethren Colony. Photograph by Lisa Decker Wollmann, July 19, 2017.

Sign at entrance to Neuhof Hutterian Brethren Colony

Sign at entrance to Neuhof Hutterian Brethren Colony

Sign at entrance to Neuhof Hutterian Brethren Colony. Photograph by Lisa Decker Wollmann, July 19, 2017.

Norwegian Immigration to the Buffalo River, 1870–1872

The Norwegians who made their homes along the Buffalo River in 1870 were among the first European settler-colonists to live in Clay County. The timing of their arrival, before the land had been surveyed, helped to draw other immigrants to the area.

One of the original Buffalo River colony cabins

The second Buffalo River cabin (built 1879) moved onto the property of Orabel Thortvedt, granddaughter of Olav Thortvedt, for restoration. Photograph by Cal Olson, June 1, 1955. Used with the permission of North Dakota State University Archives.

One of the original Buffalo River colony cabins

One of the original Buffalo River colony cabins

One of the original Buffalo River colony cabins, built in 1879 and restored by Orabel Thortvedt, granddaughter of Olav Thortvedt. Photograph by Cal Olson, June 1, 1955. Used with the permission of North Dakota State University Archives.

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