Photograph of Simonet Furniture Store

Simonet Furniture Store

The Simonet Furniture Store, Nelson and South Main Streets, Stillwater, ca. 1880. Founded in 1867 by Sebastian Simonet, a master carpenter and Romansh immigrant, ca. 1880. Photograph by John Runk.

Photograph of the DeGonda Family

DeGonda Family

The DeGonda family in Le Sueur County, ca. 1916. In 1866, Mary Muggli DeGonda and her five surviving children emigrated from Graubünden to Minnesota. This photograph shows the siblings about fifty years later. Pictured are (left to right, back row): Gion Rest (John) DeGonda; Giachen Antoni (Jacob) DeGonda; and (left to right, front row): Onna Maria Turte (Mary Dorothy) DeGonda Freiberg; Rosa Martina (Rose) DeGonda Simonett; and Maria Aloisa (Louisa) DeGonda Joerg. From the Richard C. DeGonda family papers; used with the permission of Richard C. DeGonda.

Romansh in Minnesota

Between 1820 and 1910, it is estimated that at least 30,000 people emigrated from the Swiss canton of Graubünden to the United States. Included in this number were Romansh people—members of an ethnically distinct Swiss population—headed for Minnesota. Beginning in 1854, they settled in Stillwater, St. Paul, the St. Henry Colony (Le Sueur County), the Stillwater-sponsored Badus Colony (South Dakota), and other communities throughout the region.

Connemara Patch

Connemara Patch began as a community of Irish immigrants on St. Paul’s East Side in the early 1880s. An unintended result of Bishop John Ireland’s Catholic colonization efforts and a victim of 1950s freeway construction, it was a small, swampy neighborhood on the banks of Phalen Creek. Despite its short and oft-forgotten existence, Connemara Patch was home to several generations of Irish working-class families and later immigrant groups.

Jake Greenberg's relief registration form

Jake Greenberg's relief registration form

Relief registration form for Jake Greenberg, 1894. From the records of the Minnesota State Commission for the Relief of Fire Sufferers, 1894–1895 (State Archives Collection, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul).

Probstfield, Randolph M. (1832–1911)

Randolph M. Probstfield is commonly considered Clay County’s first European settler-colonist. A farmer in the Red River Valley, he was a local leader in politics, education, and agricultural development from his arrival in Minnesota in 1859 until his death in 1911.

Miss Miyazaki Japanese Friendship Doll

Concerned by the anti-Japanese atmosphere in the United States in the 1920s, Dr. Sidney Gulick established the Committee on World Friendship Among Children and began sending friendship dolls to Japan. Japan reciprocated by sending friendship dolls to the US in 1927, with Minnesota receiving a doll known as "Miss Miyazaki."

Hutterian Brethren, Cottonwood County

South Dakota Hutterite families with roots in the Anabaptist Reformation of the sixteenth-century moved to Cottonwood County in 1994. There, they established the Neuhof Hutterian Brethren Colony and the Elmendorf Hutterian Brethren Colony south of Mountain Lake, Minnesota.

Dora Decker and Amos Decker Sr.

Dora Decker and Amos Decker Sr.

Dora Decker and Amos Decker Sr., some of the first residents of Neuhof Hutterian Brethren Colony. Photograph by Lisa Decker Wollmann, July 19, 2017.

Sign at entrance to Neuhof Hutterian Brethren Colony

Sign at entrance to Neuhof Hutterian Brethren Colony

Sign at entrance to Neuhof Hutterian Brethren Colony. Photograph by Lisa Decker Wollmann, July 19, 2017.

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