Image depicting the 1876 Chaska brick Wendelin and Julianna Grimm house, showing 1924 Grimm alfalfa marker in foreground, 2004.

1876 Chaska brick Wendelin and Julianna Grimm house, showing 1924 Grimm alfalfa marker in foreground

Image depicting the 1876 Chaska brick Wendelin and Julianna Grimm house, showing 1924 Grimm alfalfa marker in foreground, 2004.

A.B. Lyman transports Grimm alfalfa seeds from his farm, Alfalfadale, near Chanhassen.  Circa 1902-1910.

A.B. Lyman transports Grimm alfalfa seeds from his farm, Alfalfadale, near Chanhassen

A.B. Lyman transports Grimm alfalfa seeds from his farm, Alfalfadale, near Chanhassen, c.1902–1910.

Wendelin and Julianna Grimm. Mr. Grimm  is the originator of Grimm's Alfalfa. Circa 1870.

Wendelin and Julianna Grimm. Mr. Grimm is the originator of Grimm's Alfalfa

Wendelin and Julianna Grimm. Mr. Grimm is the originator of Grimm's Alfalfa, c.1870.

Grimm, Wendelin (1818–1890) and "Grimm Alfalfa"

Wendelin Grimm was born October 18, 1818 in Kulsheim, Baden, Germany, to Valentine and Marie (Adelmann) Grimm. He grew up in a farm rich area of southern Germany, learning important crops and farming practices. In 1845, Grimm married Julianna Segner (born June 15, 1821) of Steinback, Baden, Germany. The Grimms chances to own a farm were limited by the land inheritance practices of the time. Farming and crop prices were under pressure, and their future in Germany looked grim. With a growing family to support, sons Frank and Joseph and daughter Ottilia, Wendelin and Julianna looked to America for their family's future.

Northern Pacific Railroad' s colonists reception house, Glyndon.

Northern Pacific Railroad' s colonists reception house, Glyndon.

Northern Pacific Railroad's colonist's reception house, Glyndon, Minnesota, 1876.

The Yeovil Colony

In 1873, George Rodgers led immigrants from southwest England to establish the Yeovil Colony in the Red River Valley on land purchased from the Northern Pacific Railroad. Despite high hopes, the settlement of New Yeovil crumbled soon after it began.

Exterior view of the Socialist Opera building in Virginia, Minnesota.

Socialist Opera House

Exterior view of the Socialist Opera building in Virginia, Minnesota. The grand opening of this building was on April 5-6, 1913. Used with permission from the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota.

Evangelical Mennonite Church, half-mile north of Mountain Lake.

Evangelical Mennonite Church, half-mile north of Mountain Lake

Description: Evangelical Mennonite Church, half-mile north of Mountain Lake, 1959.

The Mennonites of Mountain Lake

Mennonites arrived at Mountain Lake in 1873. Mennonites are a Protestant Christian group with sixteenth century European origins. Their name refers to Menno Simons, who was a Dutch religious reformer. Simons preached a fundamentalist, more literal interpretation of the Bible. He also emphasized the importance of adult baptism. Along with these beliefs, Simons promoted a simple way of life similar to Jesus Christ and the apostles. As part of his creed, he stressed the importance of Christian brotherhood, pacifism, and the primacy of family in Christian life. The tenet of pacifism played a significant role throughout Mennonite history.

Traverse des Sioux treaty marker.

Traverse des Sioux treaty marker.

A stone marking the site of the treaty, c.1950.

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