Election of Mee Moua to the Minnesota Senate, 2002

In a special state senate election held in January of 2002, Mee Moua became the first Asian woman chosen to serve in the Minnesota Legislature and the first Hmong American elected to any state legislature. Her win in St. Paul’s District 67 made national news and had lasting political and cultural impacts on the Hmong community.

Center for Hmong Arts & Talent (CHAT)

The Center for Hmong Arts & Talent (CHAT) is an arts advocacy group based in St. Paul’s Frogtown neighborhood. Since its inception in 1998, CHAT has transformed into a social justice arts organization that engages with local and national Hmongcommunities. In addition to providing diverse arts-based programs, CHAT uses innovative strategies to address social issues affecting Hmong Americans.

Labor Lyceum and Workmen’s Circle

A small, committed group of Jewish immigrants raised the funds needed to build the Labor Lyceum at 1426 Sixth Avenue North in Minneapolis in 1915. The two-story brick and stucco building was a hub for radical Jewish cultural, political, and social activities for the next thirty-five years.

Northeast Neighborhood House, Minneapolis

Constructed in Minneapolis in 1919, the Northeast Neighborhood House (NENH) served both as a portal into American society for newly arrived immigrants from Eastern Europe and as an advocate for the neighborhood's underprivileged. It is a notable example of a social institution created solely for the betterment of the disadvantaged.

Black and white photograph of Swede Hollow, c.1969.

Swede Hollow after being cleared out

Swede Hollow, c.1969.

Black and white photograph of the burning of Swede Hollow, St. Paul, 1956.

Burning of Swede Hollow, St. Paul

After deeming Swede Hollow an unhealthy place to live, the city evicted the remaining families and burned what structures remained, 1956. Photograph by the St. Paul Dispatch & Pioneer Press.

Black and white photograph of boxcar chapel in Swede Hollow, 1949.

Boxcar chapel in Swede Hollow, St. Paul; served the Mexican American Community

Boxcar chapel in Swede Hollow, 1949. Mexican Americans were the final immigrant group to call Swede Hollow home. Photograph by St. Paul Dispatch.

Black and white lithograph print on paper of Swede Hollow, c.1936.

Lithograph of Swede Hollow, St. Paul

Black and white lithograph print on paper of Swede Hollow by Vera Andrus, c.1936.

Black and white photograph of children in Swede Hollow, 1935.

Swede Hollow Junior Gang, St. Paul

Group of children in Swede Hollow, 1935. Back row, left to right: Richard Steele, George Silva, Matthew Manocchio, Joseph Sanchelli, Lupe Limon; Middle row, left to right: Dominick DaLoia, Donald Steele, John DaLoia, Antonia Silva, Agapita Limon, Catherine Limon; Front row, left to right: Michael Silva, Margaret Steele, Mary Limon or Alvera Silva.

Black and white photograph of Swede Hollow, c.1927.

View into Swede Hollow

Swede Hollow, c.1927. Photograph by Edward Albert Fairbrother.

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