Black and white photo print of Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) Indian Agency, c. 1860.

Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) Indian Agency on the Owatonna Road near Mankato

Black-and-white photo print of the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) Indian Agency, c.1860.

The Ho-Chunk and Blue Earth, 1855–1863

In 1855 a federal treaty moved the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) people from their reservation near Long Prairie to a site along the Blue Earth River. The Ho-Chunk farmed the area's rich soil with some success, but drew the hostility of white neighbors who wanted the land for themselves. Though they did not participate in the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862 they were exiled from Minnesota during the conflict's aftermath.

Black and white photograph of Ho-Chunk leader Little Hill, who was one of his people's leading orators, c.1865.

Little Hill, Ho-Chunk leader

Ho-Chunk leader Little Hill was one of his people's leading orators, c.1865.

Black and white photograph of Ho-Chunk leader, Winneshiek II, c.1865.

Winneshiek II, Ho-Chunk leader

Ho-Chunk leader, Winneshiek II, c.1865.

Black and white photograph of Winneshiek II (second from left) and other Ho-Chunk leaders, c.1865.

Winneshiek II (second from left) and other Ho-Chunk leaders

Winneshiek II (second from left) and other Ho-Chunk leaders, at Fort Snelling, c.1865. The man third from the left is thought to be Waukon Decorah, a leader in Ho-Chunk diplomatic relations with the United States.

Black and white photograph of Henry Mower Rice, 1863.

Henry Mower Rice

Henry Mower Rice, 1863. Rice was deeply involved in the Ho-Chunk removal to Long Prairie. Though trusted by many Ho-Chunk, he used their situation for political and monetary gain.

Baptiste Lasallier, Ho-Chunk leader with Charles Mix, Indian Agent, and a trade merchant, 1857.

Baptiste Lasallier, Ho-Chunk leader with traders

Baptiste Lasallier, Ho-Chunk leader with Charles Mix, Indian Agent, and a trade merchant, 1857.

Black and white photograph of the Ho-Chunk leader Baptiste Lasallier wearing a mix of American Indian and Euro-American clothing, c.1855.

Baptiste Lasallier, Ho-Chunk leader

Black and white photograph of the Ho-Chunk leader Baptiste Lasallier wearing a mix of American Indian and Euro-American clothing, c.1855.

The Ho-Chunk and Long Prairie, 1846–1855

In 1848 the U.S. government removed the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) from their reservation in the northeastern part of Iowa to Long Prairie in Minnesota Territory. The Ho-Chunk found the land at Long Prairie a poor choice to meet their needs as farmers. In 1855 they were moved again, this time to a reservation in southern Minnesota.

Color image of an oil on canvas painting of William Rainey Marshall, 1881.

Governor William Marshall

Oil on canvas painting of William Rainey Marshall, 1881.

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