Baptiste Lasallier, Ho-Chunk leader with Charles Mix, Indian Agent, and a trade merchant, 1857.

Baptiste Lasallier, Ho-Chunk leader with traders

Baptiste Lasallier, Ho-Chunk leader with Charles Mix, Indian Agent, and a trade merchant, 1857.

Black and white photograph of the Ho-Chunk leader Baptiste Lasallier wearing a mix of American Indian and Euro-American clothing, c.1855.

Baptiste Lasallier, Ho-Chunk leader

Black and white photograph of the Ho-Chunk leader Baptiste Lasallier wearing a mix of American Indian and Euro-American clothing, c.1855.

The Ho-Chunk and Long Prairie, 1846–1855

In 1848 the U.S. government removed the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) from their reservation in the northeastern part of Iowa to Long Prairie in Minnesota Territory. The Ho-Chunk found the land at Long Prairie a poor choice to meet their needs as farmers. In 1855 they were moved again, this time to a reservation in southern Minnesota.

Color image of an oil on canvas painting of William Rainey Marshall, 1881.

Governor William Marshall

Oil on canvas painting of William Rainey Marshall, 1881.

Black and white photo print on paper of Governor William Marshall and the Minnesota State Senate, 1868.

Governor, Lieut. Governor and Senate of Minnesota

Black and white photo print on paper of Governor William Marshall and the Minnesota State Senate, 1868.

Black and white photograph of Hanford L. Gordon, c.1867.

Hanford L. Gordon

Black and white photograph of Hanford L. Gordon, c.1867.

Black and white photo print of Governor William Marshall and the House of Representatives, 1868,

Governor Marshall and the Minnesota House of Representatives

Black and white photo print on paper of Governor William Marshall and the Minnesota House of Representatives, 1868.

Convention of Colored Citizens program cover

Proceedings of the Convention of Colored Citizens of the State of Minnesota program, 1869. This program was presented at the first political convention black Minnesotans held after gaining the right to vote. The celebration held on January 1, 1869 in St. Paul also marked the creation of the Sons of Freedom, the first African American civil rights group in Minnesota.

Black Suffrage in Minnesota, 1868

From their state's admission to the Union until the mid-1860s, a majority of Minnesotans advocated the abolition of slavery in the South. Black suffrage, however, did not enjoy the same support. Minnesota's black citizens paid taxes, fought in wars, and fostered their communities. But they could not vote, hold political office, or serve on juries. This continued until 1868 when an amendment to the state's constitution approved suffrage for all non-white men.

Black and white print of the first capitol building of Minnesota Territory c.1849.

Central House, St. Paul - "First Capitol" of Minnesota Territory

Black and white print of the first capitol building of Minnesota Territory c.1849.

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