James J. Hill House

Sitting on a bluff overlooking the Mississippi River and the city of St. Paul, the 36,500-square- foot, forty-two-room James J. Hill House stands as a monument to the man who built the Great Northern Railway. It remains one of the best examples of Richardsonian Romanesque mansions in the country.

Black and white photograph of Bishop Whipple's library, c.1900.

Bishop Whipple's library

Bishop Whipple's library, c.1900. Photograph by Frank Jay Haynes.

Black and white photograph of Bishop Henry Whipple, c.1898.

Bishop Henry Whipple

Bishop Henry Whipple, c.1898. Photograph by Russell & Sons.

Black and white photograph of Bishop Whipple and others at St. Cornelia's Church, Morton, c.1895.

Bishop Whipple and others at St. Cornelia's Church, Morton

Bishop Whipple (seated center, right) and others at St. Cornelia's Church, Morton, c.1895.

Black and white photograph of Enmegahbowh (Reverend John Johnson) and Bishop Whipple, c.1898.

Enmegahbowh (Reverend John Johnson) and Bishop Whipple

Enmegahbowh (Reverend John Johnson) and Bishop Whipple, c.1898.

Black and white photograph of Enmegahbowh (Reverend John Johnson), c.1885.

Enmegahbowh (Reverend John Johnson)

Enmegahbowh (Reverend John Johnson), c.1885.

Black and white photograph of the confirmation of Dakota at Fort Snelling, 1863.

Bishop Henry B. Whipple preaching to the Dakota at the Fort Snelling concentration camp

Bishop Henry B. Whipple preaching to the Dakota at the Fort Snelling concentration camp, 1863.

Black and white photograph of Cathedral Church of Our Merciful Savior, Faribault, c.1870.

Cathedral Church of Our Merciful Savior, Faribault

Cathedral Church of Our Merciful Savior, Faribault, c.1870.

Black and white photograph of Bishop Henry B. Whipple, c.1860.

Bishop Henry B. Whipple

Henry B. Whipple, c.1860.

Whipple, Henry Benjamin (1822–1901)

Henry Benjamin Whipple, the first Episcopal bishop of Minnesota, is known for his missionary work among the Dakota and Ojibwe and his efforts to reform the U.S. Indian administration system. After the U.S.–Dakota War of 1862, Whipple was one of the few white men to oppose the death sentences of 303 Dakota.

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