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Tinted color postcard of High bridge c.1905.

High bridge, St. Paul

Tinted postcard of High bridge c.1905.

Black and white photoprint of High bridge c.1904.

Reconstructing the High Bridge partially blown down in the cyclone of 1904

Black and white photoprint of High bridge c.1904.

Black and white photoprint of High bridge after tornado August 20, 1904.

Smith Avenue viaduct (High Bridge) following storm, St. Paul

Black and white photoprint of High bridge after tornado, August 20, 1904.

Black and white photoprint of high bridge construction c. January, 1889.

View of High bridge being built, St. Paul

Black and white photoprint of high bridge construction c. January, 1889.

Black and white photoprint of high bridge construction c. March 1889

Construction of the first High bridge

Black and white photoprint of high bridge construction c. March, 1889.

Black and white photoprint of high bridge construction c. January, 1889.

View of High bridge being built

Black and white photoprint of high bridge construction c. January, 1889.

Black and white photoprint of high bridge construction c. November 1888.

View of high bridge construction

Black and white photoprint of high bridge construction c. November 1888.

St. Paul's Original High Bridge

When St. Paul's High Bridge opened in 1889, only one bridge in the United States surpassed it in height and length. Built of wrought iron and designed for wagons, the High Bridge served mainly cars and trucks. It was demolished in 1985 after ninety-six years of service.

Oil-on-canvas painting of steamboats traveling the Mississippi River. Painted by Ferdinand Richardt in 1857.

View on the Mississippi River

Oil-on-canvas painting of steamboats traveling the Mississippi River. Painted by Ferdinand Richardt in 1857.

Rock Island Excursion, 1854

On February 22, 1854, the Chicago and Rock Island Railroad completed the first rail line to connect the Mississippi River to the Atlantic Ocean. To promote that feat the company contacted notable East Coast citizens and journalists and invited them to ride their train to Rock Island. From there, the visitors took a steamboat trip up the Mississippi, stopping at St. Paul. The journalists, pleased with what they saw, wrote of the beauty and splendor of a region that many in the East thought was little more than a wilderness.

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