Black and white photograph of the first (#3) and latest (#307) locomotives, Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway Company, Two Harbors, 1916.

First (#3) and latest (#307) locomotives, Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway

On predecessor road Duluth and Iron Range, two locomotives, 1916. The foreground features the first steam locomotive of the railroad.

Black and white photograph of the Duluth & Iron Range Railroad shops, Two Harbors, 1915.

Duluth & Iron Range Railroad shops, Two Harbors

Predecessor road Duluth and Iron Range at Two Harbors where car maintenance and repair took place, 1915.

Black and white photograph of the large classification yard and part of the shops complex at Proctor, 1900.

Duluth, Missabe and Northern railroad yards at Proctor

The large classification yard and part of the shops complex at Proctor, 1900.

Black and white photograph of a 221 "Yellowstone" steam locomotive, 1940.

221 "Yellowstone" steam locomotive

The 221 was the first "Yellowstone"-type steam locomotive delivered to the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range, and the first to be road tested out of Two Harbors. This view shows the locomotive en route to the DM&IR, wearing a "Baldwin Locomotive Works" banner, 1940. Note that the main rods, eccentric cranks, eccentric rods, etc. have been removed for transport.

Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway

The Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway (DM&IR) was a small railroad that hauled iron ore and taconite from the mines of northern Minnesota’s Mesabi and Vermilion Iron Ranges to docks on Lake Superior at Duluth and Two Harbors. It operated in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Color image of a Great Northern Railway "Snow Train" sign, ca. 1942

Great Northern Railway "Snow Train" sign

This sign was attached to a float in the St. Paul Winter Carnival parade, ca. 1942. The image of the mountain goat was used extensively in advertising and equipment livery by the Great Northern. Mountain goats are plentiful at Glacier National Park, which was a site of great importance in the marketing of Great Northern passenger service. However, its use as a symbol by the Great Northern is said to have originated from former railroad president William Kenney. He employed one in the delivery of newspapers as a boy.

Black and white photograph of a Great Northern Railway float, at the St. Paul Winter Carnival, 1942.

Great Northern Railway float

Great Northern Railway float, St. Paul Winter Carnival, 1942.

Black and white photograph of a Minnesota exhibit of farm product in railway car, Great Northern Railway, Western Governors Special, ca. 1911.

Minnesota exhibit of farm product in railway car

Minnesota exhibit of farm product in railway car, Great Northern Railway, Western Governors Special, ca. 1911.

Black and white photograph of the Great Northern streamliner train in Glacier National Park, ca. 1955. Photograph by the Great Northern Railway.

Great Northern streamliner train in Glacier National Park

Great Northern streamliner train in Glacier National Park, ca. 1955. Photograph by the Great Northern Railway.

Black and white photograph of load capacity figures being stenciled on a Great Northern Railway boxcar, ca. 1957.

Load capacity figures being stenciled on a Great Northern Railway boxcar

Load capacity figures are stenciled on each boxcar as it comes out of the paint shop at Great Northern Railway's shops in St. Cloud, ca. 1957. Photograph by Henrich-Blessing Studio.

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