Origins of the American Legion in Minnesota, 1919–1922

At the close of World War I, the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) was the only centralized veterans’ organization prepared to help returning soldiers re-enter civilian life and to assist the families of the deceased. The American Legion formed soon after the war in order to serve veterans returning from Europe. Minnesota’s department of the Legion answered the call, creating programs that assisted veterans and led the way for the organization.

Oil-on-canvas study created by Douglas Volk for his painting Second Minnesota Regiment at Mission Ridge, c.1905.

Study for "Second Minnesota Regiment at Mission Ridge"

Oil-on-canvas study created by Douglas Volk for his painting Second Minnesota Regiment at Mission Ridge, c.1905.

Black and white photograph of Adolf Dehn (standing at right) while serving time in the guard house of an army camp, Spartanburg, South Carolina, 1918.

Adolf Dehn (standing at right) serving time in the guard house, Spartanburg, South Carolina

Adolf Dehn (standing at right) while serving time in the guard house of an army camp, Spartanburg, South Carolina, 1918.

Black and white photograph of refugees of the U.S.–Dakota War of 1862 camping on the prairie, 1862.

Refugees of the U.S.–Dakota War of 1862 camping on the prairie

Refugees of the U.S.–Dakota War of 1862 camping on the prairie, 1862.

Black and white photograph of Charles Augustus Lindbergh with Tommy McGuire in the South Pacific, 1944.

Charles Augustus Lindbergh with Tommy McGuire in the South Pacific

Charles Augustus Lindbergh with Tommy McGuire in the South Pacific, 1944.

Black and white photograph of Second Lieutenant Charles Augustus Lindbergh in his U.S. Air Force uniform, March 14, 1925.

Second Lieutenant Charles Augustus Lindbergh

Second Lieutenant Charles Augustus Lindbergh in his U.S. Air Force uniform, March 14, 1925.

Younger Brothers After the Attempted Northfield Bank Robbery

Government Records Specialist Charlie Rodgers tells the story of what happened to the brothers after their capture.

Collage of black and white photographs of Minnesota citizens and James-Younger Gang members, 1876.

Collage of Minnesota citizens and James-Younger Gang members

Collage of Minnesota citizens and James-Younger Gang members, 1876. Top left to right: August Suborn (Oscar Sorbel), Joseph Lee Haywood, Sheriff Glispin, Bob Younger, Charlie Pitts (deceased), Jim Younger, Cole Younger , Clell Miller, and Bill Chadwell (center, deceased).

Black and white photograph of the six officials and volunteers, known as the “Madelia Seven,” who captured the Younger brothers outside Madelia on September 21, 1876.

“Madelia Seven” who captured the Younger Brothers

The six officials and volunteers, known as the “Madelia Seven,” who captured the Younger brothers outside Madelia on September 21, 1876. Left to right: George A. Bradford, James Glispin, W.W. Murphey, Charles A. Pomeroy, Benjamin M. Rice, S. J. Severson, Thomas L. Vought.

Black and white photograph of Jim Younger after being captured, September 1876. His face and shirt are bloody from a bullet wound in his jaw he received during the shoot out outside Madelia.  Photographed by Jacoby’s Art Gallery.

Jim Younger after being captured

Jim Younger after being captured, September 1876. His face and shirt are bloody from a bullet wound in his jaw he received during the shoot out outside Madelia. Photographed by Jacoby’s Art Gallery.

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