Thirty-fourth “Red Bull” Infantry Division

The Thirty-fourth “Red Bull” Infantry Division is a U.S. Army National Guard division based in Minnesota. It had more days in combat during World War II than any other American division. Since September 11, 2001, “Red Bulls” have deployed where needed in the world, including Afghanistan and Iraq.

Black and white photograph of the statue of Germania being removed from the Germania Building, St. Paul, 1918.

Statue of Germania being removed from the Germania Building, St. Paul

Statue of Germania being removed from the Germania Building, St. Paul, 1918.

Black and white photograph of men tarred and feathered in Minnesota during 1918 campaign by anti-Nonpartisan Leaguers,  c.1918.

Men tarred and feathered by anti-Nonpartisan Leaguers

Men tarred and feathered in Minnesota during 1918 campaign by anti-Nonpartisan Leaguers, c.1918.

Anti-German Nativism, 1917–1919

When the United States entered World War I in 1917, Germans were the single largest ethnic group in Minnesota. Nativism during this period was a “patriotic” attitude that saw recent immigrants—particularly those of German descent— as potentially traitorous. Many felt that because German Americans shared their heritage with the Kaiser and the German Empire, they would side with the enemy power. That many German Americans advocated neutrality until the U.S. declared war was further proof of disloyalty to nativists.

Black and white photograph of National Guardsmen patrolling Plymouth Avenue in North Minneapolis, July 1967.

National Guardsmen on Plymouth Avenue

National Guardsmen patrol Plymouth Avenue in North Minneapolis, July 1967.

Black and white photograph of National Guardsmen patrolling Plymouth Avenue in North Minneapolis, July 1967.

Civilians and National Guardsmen on Plymouth Avenue

Civilians and National Guardsmen on Plymouth Avenue in North Minneapolis, July 1967.

Black and white photograph of boarded-up storefronts on Plymouth Avenue in North Minneapolis, July 1967. Photographed by Twiggs.

Storefronts boarded up on Plymouth Avenue

Boarded-up storefronts on Plymouth Avenue in North Minneapolis, July 1967. Photographed by Twiggs.

Black and white photograph of boarded-up storefronts on Plymouth Avenue in North Minneapolis, July 1967. Photographed by Twiggs.

Boarded-up storefronts on Plymouth Avenue

Boarded-up storefronts on Plymouth Avenue in North Minneapolis, July 1967. Photographed by Twiggs.

Black and white photograph of the aftermath of civil unrest in North Minneapolis, July 1967. Photographed by Twiggs.

Aftermath of civil unrest in North Minneapolis

Aftermath of civil unrest in North Minneapolis, July 1967. Photographed by Twiggs.

Civil Unrest on Plymouth Avenue, Minneapolis, 1967

On the night of July 19, 1967, racial tension in North Minneapolis erupted along Plymouth Avenue in a series of acts of arson, assaults, and vandalism. The violence, which lasted for three nights, is often linked with other race-related demonstrations in cities across the nation during 1967’s “long hot summer.”

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