Gág, Wanda (1893–1946)

Wanda Gág (rhymes with "cog") was determined to be an artist, and ultimately she triumphed. Her talent steered her through family hardship and hesitant early artistic efforts until she created Millions of Cats, her beloved 1928 children's book. It has never been out of print.

The Andrews Sisters

Portrait of the three Andrews Sisters, from top: LaVerne, Patty, and Maxene, April 7, 1952.

The Andrews Sisters

The Andrews Sisters hold a singular place among the many famous Minnesota-born musical talents who have made it big. Rising to fame in the swing era of the late 1930s, they developed their successful close-harmony formula early on. Patty, the blond mezzo-soprano, sang lead; Maxene, the brunette, sang soprano; and LaVerne, the redhead, sang contralto. The trio recorded more than six hundred songs, sold over ninety million records, earned fifteen gold records, and had a dozen number-one hits. Forty-six of their tunes made it to the Billboard Top Ten chart—more than either Elvis Presley or The Beatles.

Photograph of Marie Frances Robinson Fawcett

Marie Frances Robinson Fawcett

Photograph of Marie Frances Robinson Fawcett, third wife of Wilford "Captain Billy" Fawcett, in 1935. Fawcett met Robinson in 1924 when she was working for an American trapshooting organization.

Photograph of Marion Fawcett and Viva Claire Meyers

Marion Fawcett and Viva Claire Meyers

Wilford "Captain Billy" Fawcett's daughter Marion and first wife, Viva Claire Meyers, pose for a formal portrait, 1929.

Photograph of Mrs. Emile Amblard sitting on a wicker chair with a tennis racquet in ther hand, a boat cap on her head, and a dog seated by her side. Circa 1910..

Mrs. Emile Amblard

Photograph of Mrs. Emile Amblard c. 1910.

Black-and-white photograph of Lola Perpich, wife of Minnesota governor Rudy Perpich, c.1978.

Lola Perpich

Photograph of Lola Perpich, wife of Minnesota governor Rudy Perpich, c.1978.

Black and white photograph of Frances Densmore with American Indian instruments.

Frances Densmore

Frances Densmore researched and recorded the music of American Indians from the 1890s through the 1950s, preserving important cultural traditions that might otherwise have been lost.

Color photograph of Columbia Graphophone used by Frances Densmore to record American Indian music, c. 1897.

Columbia Graphophone phonograph used by Frances Densmore

Columbia Graphophone (Type AT) used by Frances Densmore to record Native American music onto cylinder records, used around 1897.

Black and white photograph of Frances Densmore being presented with citation by Harold Dean Carter.

Frances Densmore being presented with the a citation from Harold Dean Cater (MHS Director)

Frances Densmore being presented with a citation from Harold Dean Carter, director of the Minnesota Historical Society 1954.

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