Dakota beaded moccasins

Dakota beaded moccasins

Leather moccasins beaded with a geometric design. Originally owned by John Other Day (Wahpeton Dakota) and given to Stephen Return Riggs, a missionary and government interpreter among the Dakota in southwestern Minnesota, ca. 1860.

Dakota beaded knife sheath

Dakota beaded knife sheath

A Dakota, possibly Yankton, beaded knife sheath dating to the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Two beaded tassels are attached to the sheath's bottom; one tassel ends in metal cones. A string ending in metal cones connects the sheath's sides on either side of its opening. The reverse side of the sheath is undecorated save for a few rows of blue beads near the opening.

Dakota glass, clay, and agate beads

Dakota glass, clay, and agate beads

Double string of beads includes glass, clay and agate beads; the strand is divided into four rings that are separated by a flat white bead with double holes. The beads are mostly amber colored with a few faceted, round, or cylindrical beads. Additional colors range from plain blue, yellow, or green to multicolored figured beads. The beads were restrung in 1962, but the original bead order has since been restored.

Dakota beaded glass necklace

Dakota beaded glass necklace

Dakota necklace made from a string of light pink amber glass beads of various sizes and shapes. The beads are European glass of the type used in the fur trade, are worn, and have been restrung on a nylon cord. Made ca. 1890.

Light blue glass trade beads

Light blue glass trade beads

Three opaque light blue pony beads made between 1700 and 1837.

Dakota beaded leather bag

Dakota beaded leather bag

A Dakota beaded and quilled leather storage or "possibles" bag. The bag is rectangular in shape, with porcupine-quilled red lines on the front and beaded geometrics on the sides, and is decorated with tufts of yellow and purple horsehair emerging from metal cones. Made by Nancy McClure Faribault, wife of David Faribault, circa 1880.

Emergence of Man Through Steel plaque

Emergence of Man Through Steel plaque

The plaque at the base of the Iron Man Memorial in Chisholm features a poem written by Veda Ponikvar that uses the monument’s formal title, “Emergence of Man Through Steel.” Photograph by David Rian, December 2020.

Front view of Iron Man Memorial

Front view of Iron Man Memorial

Front view of the Iron Man Memorial, Chisholm. Photo by Suzanne Rian, October 2020.

Side view of the Iron Man Memorial, Chisholm

Side view of the Iron Man Memorial, Chisholm

Side view of the Iron Man Memorial, Chisholm. Photograph by Pete Markham, April 22, 2009. CC BY-SA 2.0

Iron Man statue on top of the Iron Man Memorial

Iron Man statue on top of the Iron Man Memorial, Chisholm

The Iron Man statue on top of the Iron Man Memorial, Chisholm. Photo by Pete Markham, April 22, 2009.

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