Kensington Runestone

The Kensington Runestone is a gravestone-sized slab of hard, gray sandstone called graywacke into which Scandinavian runes are cut. It stands on display in Alexandria, Minnesota, as a unique record of either Norse exploration of North America or Minnesota’s most brilliant and durable hoax.

Kensington Runestone replica

Kensington Runestone replica

Kensington Runestone replica in Alexandria, Minnesota, 1958.

Kensington Runestone replica

Kensington Runestone replica

Kensington Runestone replica, Douglas County, 1950.

Gilbert Hanson, Olof Ohman, and John Eklaun

Gilbert Hanson, Olof Ohman, and John Eklaun

Gilbert Hanson, Olof Ohman, and John Eklaun at a carnival near Kensington, 1927. The carnival was held at the Herman Fahlin farm to raise funds to buy a park for the Kensington Runestone.

The Kensington Runestone, side view.

Kensington Runestone

The Kensington Runestone, side view, ca. 1920.

Site of the discovery of the Kensington Runestone

Site of the discovery of the Kensington Runestone. Left to right: Edwin Bjerklund, Olaf Flaaten, Olof Ohman, ca. 1910.

Front view of the Kensington Runestone

Kensington Runestone

The Kensington Runestone, front view, ca. 1920.

Osmund Osmundson grave marker, Valley Grove. Photo taken in 2019.

Osmund Osmundson grave marker

Osmund Osmundson grave marker, Valley Grove. Photo taken in 2019.

Osmund Osmundson, ca. 1910

Osmund Osmundson

Osmund Osmundson, ca. 1910

Osmundson, Osmund O. (1826–1914)

Osmund Osmundson, founder of Nerstrand, Minnesota, played a prominent role in a variety of local affairs, including business, civics, and education. He was one of several men who incorporated St. Olaf College in 1874. Built in 1880, his spacious brick house in Nerstrand was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

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