Red River cart squeal

The sound of a replica Red River cart in motion. Archivist Mark Peihl of the Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County explains, "We have in our collection a wonderful replica cart built by John Hall and Eddie Gudmundson. It’s a very typical looking cart. It weighs about 400 pounds and could carry 800 pounds. The heart of the cart is a pair of heavy, parallel, twelve-foot-long shafts. The single draft animal stood between the shafts to pull. The box rests on the shafts, mortised to keep it in place. The corner posts and side rails of the box are ingeniously located to allow side boards to be slipped in to keep objects from falling out of the cart. The all-wood carts were easy to repair with wood found along the route. The hubs were left ungreased––trail dust would mix with lubricants and work like sandpaper. So they squeaked. Of the dozens of cart trip descriptions I’ve read, every one mentions the annoying squeal of the carts." Used with the permission of the Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County.

MN90: The Faribault WASP

Elizabeth “Betty” Wall, a pilot from Faribault, Minnesota, arrived in Texas in 1943 to do her part during World War II. Unlike male recruits, she had to pay her train fare—and her room and board—while she trained to become a member of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs). Britt Aamodt reports in this MN90 segment.

George A. Hormel and Company delivery wagon

George A. Hormel and Company delivery wagon

A delivery wagon used by employees of George A. Hormel and Company, ca. 1900.

Interior of the canoe warehouse at Grand Portage

Interior of the canoe warehouse at Grand Portage

Interior of the reconstructed canoe warehouse at Grand Portage National Monument. Photograph by Flickr user Sean Marshall, August 6, 2019. CC BY-SA 2.0

Canoe in the Stockade Museum at Grand Portage

Canoe in the Stockade Museum at Grand Portage

The interior of the Great Hall at Grand Portage which was used as a museum, ca. 1940. The museum included small objects recovered as part of archaeological investigations of the site. Initially, the Great Hall also included a gift shop and cafe. Most of the museum’s contents were destroyed in a 1969 fire.

Grand Portage National Monument

The Grand Portage National Monument in far northeastern Minnesota was established in 1960, after the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa (Ojibwe) ceded nearly 710 acres of their land to the US government. A unit of the National Park Service (NPS), it consists of the eight-and-a-half-mile Grand Portage trail and two trading depot sites—one on the shoreline of Lake Superior and one inland, at Pigeon River. A partially reconstructed depot sits at the Lake Superior site.

Canoers in Superior National Forest

Canoers in Superior National Forest

Canoers portaging a canoe in Superior National Forest, St. Louis County, Minnesota, 1925. From the North Star Museum of Boy Scouting and Girl Scouting.

Canoeists at Moose Lake Landing

Canoeists at Moose Lake Landing

Canoeists from Camp Thunderbird at Moose Lake Landing, an entrance to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in the Kawishiwi Ranger District of the Superior National Forest. Photograph (R9_485431) by P. Freeman Heim, August 1957. Used courtesy of the Forest History Society, Durham, North Carolina. CC BY-SA 2.0

Forest Service workers in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

Forest Service workers in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

Donald Ferguson and Bruce Casey of the US Forest Service prepare to portage around Lower Basswood Falls in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) inside the Superior National Forest, Minnesota. Photograph (FHS855) by Roy Dale Sanders, July 1961. Used courtesy of the Forest History Society, Durham, NC. CC BY-SA 2.0

Fred and Mary Price in their Cadillac

Fred and Mary Price in their Cadillac

Fred and Mary Price in their Cadillac, 1913–1914. Mary holds her dog, Chum. From "Etchison's Story is Unshaken Under Severe Grilling," Minneapolis Journal, January 11, 1916, 1. Mary and Chum exited the same car on the night of November 28, 1914, and fell to their deaths from a cliff. Image reproduced from microfilm at the Minnesota Historical Society with permission from the Minneapolis Journal.

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