Black and white photoprint of Joseph Renshaw Brown photographed c.1860.

Joseph R. Brown

Joseph Renshaw Brown, c.1860.

Brown, Joseph Renshaw (1805–1870)

During his five decades in Minnesota, Joseph R. Brown was a significant figure in territorial and state politics. Although he never held high office, he exercised great influence on how the region developed. His ability to produce legislative results earned him the nickname, “Jo the Juggler.”

Black and white photograph of two men breaking apart an illegal still,1940. Photographed by the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

Two men breaking apart an illegal still

Two men break apart an illegal still,1940. Photographed by the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

Black and white photograph of a group of people dismantling a still at Pillsbury and Charles Streets in St. Paul, c.1925.

Dismantling a still, at Pillsbury and Charles Street, St. Paul

A group of people dismantling a still at Pillsbury and Charles Streets in St. Paul, c.1925.

Black and white photograph of police destroying an illegal alcohol still during Prohibition, 1925. Photographed by the St. Paul Daily News.

Police destroying an illegal still

Police destroy an illegal alcohol still during Prohibition, 1925. Photographed by the St. Paul Daily News.

Black and white photograph of a group of people dismantling a still at Pillsbury and Charles Streets in St. Paul, c.1925.

Dismantling a still, Pillsbury and Charles Street, St. Paul

A group of people dismantling a still at Pillsbury and Charles Streets in St. Paul, c.1925.

National Prohibition Act (Volstead Act)

Writers of the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution took a little more than one hundred words to prohibit the manufacture, sale, and transportation of alcoholic beverages. It fell to Minnesota Congressman Andrew Volstead to write the regulations and rules for enforcement. The twelve-thousand-word Volstead Act remained in effect for thirteen years, from 1920 until Prohibition was repealed in December 1933.

Black and white photograph of a Finnish Stock Company, Ely, 1915.

Finnish Stock Company

Finnish Stock Company, Ely, 1915.

Women on the World War I Home Front

After the United States entered World War I in 1917, Minnesota women, like Americans across the nation, were called to contribute to the war effort. Though some went to Europe and served as nurses, drivers, and aid workers on the battlefields, many more participated on the home front. They took on new jobs, conserved vital resources, and joined volunteer organizations. At the same time, they struggled to come to terms with conflicting ideals of patriotism, loyalty, and what it meant to be an American.

Black and white photograph of a worker packing butter at a creamery in Hawley, c. 1917.

Butter packing at a Hawley creamery

A worker packs butter at a creamery in Hawley, c.1917.

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