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Color image of a “Vote Betty Crocker” pin, c.1950s.

“Vote Betty Crocker” pin

“Vote Betty Crocker” pin, c.1950s.

Black and white photograph of a wedding in the family of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Uram; bride and groom at gift table looking at Betty Crocker cook book, 1950.

Wedding in the family of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Uram; bride and groom at gift table looking at Betty Crocker cook book

Wedding in the family of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Uram; bride and groom at gift table looking at Betty Crocker cook book, 1950. Photograph by Lee Brothers.

Black and white photograph of the Betty Crocker Test Kitchens, c.1950.

Betty Crocker Test Kitchens

Betty Crocker Test Kitchens, c.1950.

Color image of a Gold Medal Flour Bag, c.1930s.

Gold Medal Flour Bag

Gold Medal Flour Bag, c.1930s.

Color image of a Gold Medal Flour and WCCO sign, c.1925.

Gold Medal Flour and WCCO sign

Gold Medal Flour and WCCO sign, c.1925.

Color portraits of Betty Crocker, 1936–1981.

Betty Crocker through the years

Portraits of Betty Crocker, 1936–1981. Photograph by the Cartwheel Company.

MN90: WCCO - How Betty Crocker Became a Good Neighbor

WCCO Radio has been around for decades, but the station has changed a lot since its start. MN90 Producer Andi McDaniel explains.

MN90: The Invention of Betty Crocker

Betty Crocker has it all. She’s wholesome, pretty, and bakes a “perfect cake every time.” Pretty impressive for a woman who doesn’t actually exist. MN90 Producer Andi McDaniel finds out how Gold Medal Flour created a persona that still charms homemakers today.

Betty Crocker

For many Americans, the name Betty Crocker evokes an image of domestic perfection. From the often-reissued Betty Crocker Picture Cookbook to the iconic red spoon logo that bears her signature, Betty Crocker is one of the most recognized names in cooking. It comes as a surprise to many that “America’s First Lady of Food” is, in fact, fictional.

Smith, Alice Gustava (Sister Maris Stella) (1899–1987)

Alice Gustava Smith, better known by her students and readers as Sister Maris Stella, taught English at the College of St. Catherine (now St. Catherine University) in St. Paul for nearly fifty years. During that time she also published books of verse that built her reputation as a skilled and spiritual poet.

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