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Black and white photograph of Governor Burnquist with officers of the Minnesota Home guard and Motor Corps, c.1918.

Governor Burnquist with officers of the Minnesota Home Guard and Motor Corps

Governor Burnquist with officers of the Minnesota Home guard and Motor Corps, c.1918.

Minnesota Home Guard

When the Minnesota National Guard was federalized in the spring of 1917, the state was left without any military organization. To defend the state’s resources, the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety (MCPS) created the Minnesota Home Guard. The Home Guard existed for the duration of World War I. Units performed civilian and military duties.

Headline from the Organized Farmer, July 8, 1932.

Inflammatory headline written by Francis Shoemaker

Headline from the Organized Farmer, July 8, 1932.

Headline written by Francis Shoemaker

Headline from the Organized Farmer, July 11, 1930

Black and white portrait of Republican Congressman August H. Andresen, c.1936.

August Andresen

Republican Congressman August H. Andresen, c.1936.

Black and white portrait of John B. Sanborn Jr., c.1925.

John B. Sanborn Jr.

John B. Sanborn Jr., c.1925.

Black and white photograph pf Francis H. Shoemaker, 1934.

Francis H. Shoemaker

Francis H. Shoemaker, 1934. Photograph by International News Photos. Collection of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Shoemaker, Francis H. (1889–1958)

Francis H. Shoemaker’s 1931–1932 journey from a Leavenworth prison cell to a seat in the U.S. Congress ranks among Minnesota’s most bizarre political odysseys. But little about Shoemaker surprised those following the meteoric career of the radical newspaper editor from Red Wing.

Oil-on-canvas portrait of Indian Agent Lawrence Taliaferro painted c.1830.

Lawrence Taliaferro

Oil-on-canvas portrait of Indian Agent Lawrence Taliaferro painted c.1830.

Dred and Harriet Scott in Minnesota

African Americans Dred Scott and Harriet Robinson Scott lived at Fort Snelling in the 1830s as enslaved people. Both the Northwest Ordinance (1787) and the Missouri Compromise (1820) prohibited slavery in the area, but slavery existed there even so. In the 1840s the Scotts sued for their freedom, arguing that having lived in “free territory” made them free. The 1857 Supreme Court decision that grew out of their suit moved the U.S. closer to civil war.

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